Niagara Falls Collapse 1954 by EndlessSunflowers in gifs

[–]ikidd 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

"I'll just step back a bit here and start shooting again..."

A reaction gif of Alex Jones going crazy by useless_aether in gifs

[–]JasonCarswell 2 insightful - 3 fun2 insightful - 2 fun3 insightful - 3 fun -  (0 children)

Put that to some phat beats and give me the same cocaine he's on and I could watch that all day.

Russians truly do not give a fuck by useless_aether in gifs

[–]Vigte 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

What the fuck did I just watch?

This mystery will haunt me until my death.

Nanobot helps a sperm cell to fertilize egg. by RavAshi in gifs

[–]useless_aether 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

good bot

Animated Lissajous curve table by magnora7 in gifs

[–]magnora7[S] 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

It is the graph produced when the x axis beats at one frequency and the y axis beats in another frequency. It's meant to be interpreted in a 2D way, but I'm sure you could come up with a valid 3D interpretation too

Animated Lissajous curve table by magnora7 in gifs

[–]wizzwizz4 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Minor rounding error, but very pretty nonetheless.

Animated Lissajous curve table by magnora7 in gifs

[–]Vigte 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

So... what is it?

Jk - is it meant to be a 2D representation of 3D "waves"? or are the shapes intended to be perceived as 3D?

Animated Lissajous curve table by magnora7 in gifs

[–]magnora7[S] 4 insightful - 1 fun4 insightful - 0 fun5 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

It shows the interaction of different frequencies in a spatial way, basically

Animated Lissajous curve table by magnora7 in gifs

[–]JasonCarswell 3 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 0 fun4 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Very cool.

Also check out : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lissajous_orbit

Particularly good for orbiting Lagrange Points.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lagrangian_point

Animated Lissajous curve table by magnora7 in gifs

[–]Vigte 3 insightful - 4 fun3 insightful - 3 fun4 insightful - 4 fun -  (0 children)

I don't feel so good anymore...

So what is it?

Octopus carries coconut shell for protection, uses it like a vehicle. (Actually quite impressive!) by Vigte in gifs

[–]Tom_Bombadil 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

They weren't leaving 74,000 years ago, they were moving back in. They had been sailing for at least 925,000 years while doing God only knows what else.

This is new to me. I'm familiar with the mt Toba mega volcano, and that's extremely interesting, and legit.

Humans as we understand them may have been around, but it seems likely that the fortunate 5000 or so humans in eastern Africa essentially won the geographic lottery. The lone survivors of extinct city-states, and empires. Everyone else died.

The Neanderthal survived though, which doesn't fit the Toba theory. Even so, it's still the best theory I'm aware of

Homo Florensis (the hobbit people). Are there the orang-pendek (or something) from Indonesia?

There's certainly more to human history than we're likely to ever prove. It's fun to imagine what it must/could have been like.

1,000,000 years ago? IDK. I'd need some compelling evidence.

Octopus carries coconut shell for protection, uses it like a vehicle. (Actually quite impressive!) by Vigte in gifs

[–]Vigte[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

The link you posted has gone down...

Additionally, I didn't really have time to fully explain this until now - but the theory of "out of Africa" has some holes in it. Humans almost certainly BEGAN in Africa, but there were some journeys along the way that seem to be conveniently forgotten. The work of Bruce Fenton is quite on point to this effect.

Given recent evidences that place neanderthals and denisovans in a completely separate lineage from us (similar to horses and donkeys, due to the sterile nature of the hybrid offspring) - coupled with "homo antecessor" having "neanderthal only traits", the time line for human divergence from the Neander/Denisov lineage, is AT LEAST 800,000 as of Jan 14 2019.

Part of this has to do with the Wallace line in Oceania and the appearance of Homo Florensis (the hobbit people).

The amount of intelligence it would take to build ships and navigate a sufficient population (likely around 120 (the "genesis number")) is beyond what we attribute to any branch of the homo grouping at that time (at LEAST 1 million years ago).

In essence, the likely theory is that homo erectus departed from Africa (this much is not in debate with science) between 2 and 1 million years ago - spread over ALL of Europe, Asia and Oceania (and potentially even to North America) - and only returned to the "African homeland of legend" during the Toba Catastrophe.

See the migration OUT of Africa, circa 74,000 BCE coincides with Toba, which as many papers point out, would have been the absolute WORST time to leave Africa.

You would literally be walking out of a beautiful lush land, into a volcanic fallout.

The majority of "first modern human" remains are found around Bab-el-Mandeb straight - which would be PRIMARY entrance into Africa.

They weren't leaving 74,000 years ago, they were moving back in. They had been sailing for at least 925,000 years while doing God only knows what else.

Octopus carries coconut shell for protection, uses it like a vehicle. (Actually quite impressive!) by Vigte in gifs

[–]JasonCarswell 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

It's like the "smart Jews" mythology.

Nobel Prize winners are connected.

Oscar winners are always corporate media.

It's just another part of their rigged systems.

Octopus carries coconut shell for protection, uses it like a vehicle. (Actually quite impressive!) by Vigte in gifs

[–]JasonCarswell 1 insightful - 2 fun1 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

Maybe octopi have secret societies and secret schools where they learn to be clickbait.

Octopus carries coconut shell for protection, uses it like a vehicle. (Actually quite impressive!) by Vigte in gifs

[–]Vigte[S] 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Exactly - the test was developed with certain mindsets "in mind" - the Oxford "posh-boy" types.

They work so hard to create something flashy and popular, then destroy it so they can offer an alternative (that changes the very way you think, by virtue of the argument against the first thing and the "refined Socially just" nature of the new answer).

"To create: one must first destroy (and then create again)"

Octopus carries coconut shell for protection, uses it like a vehicle. (Actually quite impressive!) by Vigte in gifs

[–]Tom_Bombadil 2 insightful - 2 fun2 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

Africans are in a literal sense more human than everyone else.

lQ test are rigged. Questions like:. A runner is to a marathon, what a sailboat is to a .. ???

... ...
... ...

...
I'm sure everyone instantly thought "Regatta", right?!

Well if you did I bet 10:1 that your parents have plenty of money...

Fuck that stupid test. That is a label of a rich man race. It has nothing to do with intelligence, but it's a question on many IQ tests.

They also like to put "Hors d'oeuvre" on the test. Every African child knows that one... /S

Put some African, Aboriginal, or First Nations games/words on the IQ test.
Then let the oligarch's kids take those tests.

Then we'll discuss their IQ results publicly.

I'm not irritated with you Vigte in any way. This is an absurd Injustice. A rigged test.

They paste it on the NYT like it's a legit issue, so we'll intentioned people can discuss it Monday morning at the office... It's a fucking crime of brainwashing.

Comedy to entertain such notions...

Octopus carries coconut shell for protection, uses it like a vehicle. (Actually quite impressive!) by Vigte in gifs

[–]Vigte[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

? Eh?

JF doesn't work for NYT... he's responding to the news regarding Watson losing his status over his comments, here. He's trying to defend Watson by saying IQ is 75-80% related to DNA, the remainder is related to parental influence, which he also says has genetic basis.

He (Watson) had told a magazine in 2007 he was "inherently gloomy about the prospect of Africa" as "all our social policies are based on the fact that their intelligence is the same as ours - where all the testing says not really".

Octopus carries coconut shell for protection, uses it like a vehicle. (Actually quite impressive!) by Vigte in gifs

[–]Tom_Bombadil 1 insightful - 2 fun1 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

The New York Times!? :-|
I'll check it out.

Octopus carries coconut shell for protection, uses it like a vehicle. (Actually quite impressive!) by Vigte in gifs

[–]Tom_Bombadil 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I've thought this since I was a kid. I don't think it should be contraversial.

Virtually all creatures that aren't nurtured by a parent(s) have an innate understanding of predator/prey relations, as well as what it supposed to eat.

Consider these instinctual aspects:

  • Spiders innately know how to make webs.
  • Fish aren't taught to swim in schools.
  • Deer can walk within an hour of birth.
  • Frogs progress from to tadpole, to frogpole (sounds legit) to frog, and it's predators/food/habitat changes significantly.
  • Hermit crabs look for shells to live in.

Doesn't instinctual information have to be inherited by it's very definition? Is is there any reason to think that complex concepts aren't also innate?

  • Humans also have a semi-unique instinctual ability: language aquisition (babies don't learn to listen for auditory cues).

Octopuses have a mind boggling list of innate abilities.

  • Color mimicry/changing/pattern/reproduction
  • Texture change.
  • Bodies that can form to a containers shape.
  • Ink.
  • Eyes without blind spots that were formed independently of all other animal classes (evolutionary convergence) - a worthy topic of it's own).
  • The ability to see colors humans cannot perceive visible.

The evolution of these incredible creatures is mind boggling. They are legit alien intelligence.

I wouldn't put much beyond the possible scope of their epigenetic potential.

I got love for the 8-puss.

Edit:. Evolutionary convergence is something to ponder. All mammals, amphibians, birds, fish, (animals), etc.; have a blind spot in the back of the eye.

Octopuses do not. This means that their ( plus cuddle fish, squid, etc.) evolutionary history is completely independent from almost every animal on the planet.

Legit alien intelligence, indeed.

Octopus carries coconut shell for protection, uses it like a vehicle. (Actually quite impressive!) by Vigte in gifs

[–]Vigte[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Exactly like the Animus, the memories of the ancestors are in the DNA!

I've always felt a strange attraction to that idea... since the first Assassin's Creed game.

Octopus carries coconut shell for protection, uses it like a vehicle. (Actually quite impressive!) by Vigte in gifs

[–]Tom_Bombadil 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

How can octopuses learn so much, with such short lifespans? There's no parenting, so they grow independently.
They must have some biological feature that passes some experience along to their offspring

Octopus carries coconut shell for protection, uses it like a vehicle. (Actually quite impressive!) by Vigte in gifs

[–]Demiurgent 2 insightful - 5 fun2 insightful - 4 fun3 insightful - 5 fun -  (0 children)

Ima tank. Brrrr.

Man getting a double strike in bowling by useless_aether in gifs

[–]happysmash27 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I feel like the "funny" upvote should be a more generic "entertaining" upvote, since posts like this are very entertaining, but not quite silly either.

Weaving together by magnora7 in gifs

[–]happysmash27 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I feel like the "funny" upvote should be a more generic "entertaining" upvote, since posts like this are very entertaining, but not quite silly either.

Also, it is awesome that I can actually comment on a post this old.