my rough draft resume. by [deleted] in programming

[–]Gregg 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

A very interesting draft, I also tried to write it myself, but I realized that it would not work correctly. Therefore, I immediately took the help of professionals https://skillroads.com/blog/fostering-friendship-at-workplace and found a job where I got not only many new employees and acquaintances, but also real friends. And for the team it is very important.

How Silicon Valley scum criticize by trident765 in programming

[–]IkeConn 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I just fart on them. They can stand there and smell it or move on.

How Silicon Valley scum criticize by trident765 in programming

[–]AmericanMuskrat 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

It's good to be cooperative

Use their own shit against them. "It's good to have effective communication."

Could make it a game, one up them every time.

How Silicon Valley scum criticize by trident765 in programming

[–]fschmidt 2 insightful - 2 fun2 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

Yes this is how they talk, but it doesn't work too well with me. My response to "It's good to be cooperative" would be "Is it good to be cooperative with cockroaches?". I guess that's why the last time I was in Silicon Valley talking to people, the conversations didn't last long.

Mercurial's original developer is trans by fschmidt in programming

[–]fschmidt[S] 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Makes sense. I guess that also explains why they like Git, because Git gives them pointless control and lets them reject reality by changing their source history. Much like changing one's sex.

Mercurial's original developer is trans by fschmidt in programming

[–]trident765 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Here are a couple that transitioned before it was trendy:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sophie_Wilson

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynn_Conway

I wonder if maybe programmers for whatever reason have an unhealthy obsession with being in control. This would be why they subscribe to ideologies that are controlling, such as liberalism. And why they feel a need to be able to control what gender they are. And why it is that when they appointed a programmer to be the department head at my last workplace, he turned out to be a micromanaging asshole.

Mercurial's original developer is trans by fschmidt in programming

[–]fschmidt[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Thank God I left that world before this happened. Any idea why? Is it because programmers are trendy?

Mercurial's original developer is trans by fschmidt in programming

[–]trident765 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

A lot of people in computer programming seem to be trans. Even from decades ago.

VironIT - Software Development company by kkkkootlos in programming

[–]kkkkootlos[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

VironIT began generating software and games in 2004 and has now evolved into a full-service software development firm. VironIT offers a wide range of services, including mobile and web application development, corporate software solutions, software integration and upgrading, as well as software support and maintenance.

Java Hashtable, HashMap, ConcurrentHashMap – Performance impact by johny_josi in programming

[–]fschmidt 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

All Java programmers should read Java Concurrency in Practice which covers this.

Java Hashtable, HashMap, ConcurrentHashMap – Performance impact by johny_josi in programming

[–]jumba_jukiba 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Java is a very relevant modern programming language. Thank you for your informative contributions.

A day in the life of a reactionary programmer by fschmidt in programming

[–]trident765 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Pointless separation is one big source of complexity

I was just thinking about this the other day. It's the thing people say to sound smart. People say to keep X and Y separate because it makes them look like they had the foresight to prevent some bad thing from happening if you mix X and Y. So people are stuck maintaining this pointless separation because if they were to question it they would look like stupid people who didn't have the foresight to understand why you have to keep X and Y separate.

Be a Product Tester Now! by [deleted] in programming

[–]fschmidt 2 insightful - 2 fun2 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

I tested the link, and it doesn't work. Maybe you need better testers for your spam links.

Be a Product Tester Now! by [deleted] in programming

[–]SoCo 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I tried product testing once, my life has never been the same since I got that Moderna vaccine. Every day is pain and I get the perk of weekly near death experiences.

A day in the life of a reactionary programmer by fschmidt in programming

[–]fschmidt[S] 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

That only makes sense if this is done by an outside process. Since I am doing it in code in the same process, I just close the file descriptor, move the file, and open a new file descriptor. So none of the issues mentioned by x0x7 apply.

A day in the life of a reactionary programmer by fschmidt in programming

[–]AmericanMuskrat 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I just didn't get why anything was moved, but x0 said it had to do with file descriptor staying open. That makes sense.

A day in the life of a reactionary programmer by fschmidt in programming

[–]fschmidt[S] 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

The only reason for more code is to allow multiple rolling backup files. Here is the code, it is quite simple.

A day in the life of a reactionary programmer by fschmidt in programming

[–]fschmidt[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Then log rotate handles all the business logic seperate from my code, and I get to "code" the log storage behavior in a "language" designed for that task.

Pointless separation is one big source of complexity. There is no reason for an end-user to ever configure logging. The app code should do that. And so it might as well do it purely through code, so no need for logrotate.

A day in the life of a reactionary programmer by fschmidt in programming

[–]AmericanMuskrat 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Gotcha. Hey thanks man, I appreciate you taking the time to explain it.

A day in the life of a reactionary programmer by fschmidt in programming

[–]x0x7 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

One reason that things like logrotate exists is that if you rename it, the open file descriptor in the program still points to it and will continue appending to it. For that you use a copy truncate. If you were to script it yourself you would copy the log to a file of the same name plus a timestamp, run truncate -s0 file to move all future appends to the front of the file, and then take any prior copies besides the most immediate one and gzip them, then take all that are so old you couldn't possibly care about them and delete them.

Or you can just have logrotate do that for you.

A day in the life of a reactionary programmer by fschmidt in programming

[–]x0x7 2 insightful - 2 fun2 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

Well that's the dumbest thing I've ever heard. I could understand an argument against centralized config files. But I run log rotate on my logs with the config file in the source code directory and the software just calls exec("logrotate -f theconfigfile") on an interval. Then log rotate handles all the business logic seperate from my code, and I get to "code" the log storage behavior in a "language" designed for that task.

A day in the life of a reactionary programmer by fschmidt in programming

[–]AmericanMuskrat 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

What I'm asking is why is this not 2 lines?

If filesize(logfile) >= arbitrary_amount
Rename(logfile, current_date + ".log")

It's been a long time since I've done this shit, maybe I'm missing something you're doing

A day in the life of a reactionary programmer by fschmidt in programming

[–]fschmidt[S] 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

No, the last file is just dumped. No need to keep logs forever.

A day in the life of a reactionary programmer by fschmidt in programming

[–]trident765 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Doesn't this run the risk of running out of filenames if the user specifies too few?

Code bloat has become astronomical by TheRealPanzer in programming

[–]MuhUkraine 3 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 0 fun4 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I put a lot of the blame on Node and specifically NPM. What's doubly crazy is that people looked at those abominations and decided to make their own stupid package managers. And most insane of all, other, even stupider people started using them. Your typical codebase nowadays uses NPM, Yarn, Brew, CocoaPods, and (perhaps worst of all) NuGet.

A day in the life of a reactionary programmer by fschmidt in programming

[–]fschmidt[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Yes, it's "rolled over" by renaming it.

A day in the life of a reactionary programmer by fschmidt in programming

[–]AmericanMuskrat 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Why don't you just rename the file if it's too big and call it a day?

Things I don't like about git by trident765 in programming

[–]MuhUkraine 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I've never really used it, and I've never been in a position to choose source control for a team.

That said, I think it's kind of a VHS-vs.-Betamax question. You have two very similar technologies, and the slightly inferior option has won out simply because someone influential selected it. For VHS I think it was Sony, or maybe porn-peddlers. For Git it's Linux.

A day in the life of a reactionary programmer by fschmidt in programming

[–]fschmidt[S] 2 insightful - 2 fun2 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

I need to write a post on why configuration files should be banned. Maybe next shabbat.

A day in the life of a reactionary programmer by fschmidt in programming

[–]smokeDrugs 2 insightful - 2 fun2 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

A day in the life of a reactionary programmer by fschmidt in programming

[–]MuhUkraine 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

That LogJ4 shit you linked is peak OO stupidity. IDK why people do that to themselves.

Code bloat has become astronomical by TheRealPanzer in programming

[–]fschmidt 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Good article. I added a comment.

Things I don't like about git by trident765 in programming

[–]GeorgeCarlin 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I don't use code others wrote for my code.

I use Haskell, mostly.

Things I don't like about git by trident765 in programming

[–]smokeDrugs 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

git checkout branch
git checkout -b branch
git checkout -- filename

one command to rule them all?

Expert Talk: Managing Complexity in Software • Hadi Hariri & Kevlin Henney • GOTO 2022 by zyxzevn in programming

[–]fschmidt 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I am not going to watch on hour-long video on this. But the solution for managing complexity is to not create any in the first place. Just write simple code. Of course modern scum love complexity and hate simplicity, so this doesn't apply to them.

Things I don't like about git by trident765 in programming

[–]fschmidt 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

So what do you use for source control?

Things I don't like about git by trident765 in programming

[–]fschmidt 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Why not use Mercurial instead?

Things I don't like about git by trident765 in programming

[–]MuhUkraine 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I don't like the interface, either, with all the weird double-dashes and whatnot. I read what you wrote about that and thought, "I don't think you actually need -- there anymore...". Who the fuck even knows except Google and my cheat sheet?

Beyond that, I like Git in theory, but another big practical thing I dislike about Git is the branching strategies that projects and organizations end up using. The pull request thing is laborious and over-used IMO. People shoot themselves in the foot making a bunch of feature branches and going off on individualistic tangents, etc.

Things I don't like about git by trident765 in programming

[–]GeorgeCarlin 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I feel you. I never really use git because of a too steep learning curve for my projects. But i'm oldschool and don't code fancy stuff, i'll admit.

Modularizing stuff is quite easy for me though, because i have a mind-system for this.

And my front-end guy... i trust him. Javascript and PHP i cannot be hassled with.

I wouldn't accept torturing myself that much. My patience sadly isn't limitless, especially with machines it ain't.

Git vs. Mercurial: Please Relax by RedViking in programming

[–]fschmidt 2 insightful - 2 fun2 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

I have a toolbox with screwdrivers, wrenches, a hammer, etc. And I have a toaster with a lever to start toasting and a knob to set the level. An appliance/application and a toolbox are different things. An appliance/application is for one purpose while a toolbox is general, used for many things. So of course modern scum invert this and use a toolbox for an application and an application for a toolbox. Source control is an application with limited needed functions, so it should not be toolbox. Programming is a general task requiring a toolbox not an application. So modern scum use Git (a toolbox) for source control and use an IDE (an application) for programming. Completely backwards, but just what one should expect from modern scum.

Reactionary Software? by fschmidt in programming

[–]LarrySwinger2 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Every server has its own public room list. For visibility, it's best to establish your room on matrix.org. But the equivalent of a Discord server are Spaces. (A space is a group of rooms that belong together.) There doesn't seem to be a public list of spaces yet; you have to invite people manually.

Python page for Reactionary Software? by fschmidt in programming

[–]trident765 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Yes, and I've even succeeded in zipping packages and including them this way, so that it is exactly like a jar library in java. But no one does this.

Python page for Reactionary Software? by fschmidt in programming

[–]fschmidt[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Why do you need a package manager? Can't you just bundle everything you need together with your software?

Python page for Reactionary Software? by fschmidt in programming

[–]trident765 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I don't have enough content to write a full article but my view of python is it is a good programming language with bad dependency management options. The most popular package managers are pip and conda. If you try to install an older python package (like 5 years old), it is always a nightmare to get it to work because it tries to update the other packages to versions that will break your software. There are ways to force it to use older versions, but with python the dependencies tend to have a bunch of other little subdependencies, so you if you want to use an old version of the dependency you have to look up what versions of all the subdependencies work with the older version of the dependency. The end result it that you are basically always forced to use the newest version of the software. This makes "client software" function in some ways more like "server software", where the current software developers have totalitarian control of their software, and if you don't like it there is really no option to revert back to an older version.

In java programs I have dealt with, the dependencies seemed more straightforward. Just a few key jar files in a folder. No stupid package manager that tries to update everything.

Python page for Reactionary Software? by fschmidt in programming

[–]qwertywerty 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Maybe you could reach out to Guido van Rossum - the creator of Python and ask him to write it for you. On his website it says that you can contact him via his email and that he tries to read .

There's also a section on his website dedicated to his writings on Python. You might be interested in his following articles on what is Python, glue it all together with Python and comparing Python to other languages in which he explains Python's strengths and it's use cases. Most of the articles on his website are quite old since most of them were written in the late 90s but they might still be useful to you.

Python programmers, help with multithreading? by fschmidt in programming

[–]SoCo 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Most of my bigger Python projects started before these features were added, so I'd just make my own event loop using 'multiprocessing' or 'threading' modules and design my own asynchronous handling around that. Now that I've tasted platforms with signals and slots, along with how nice that works with asynchronous queuing and event loops, the await/promise patterns seems kind of a clunky way of doing things.

Python programmers, help with multithreading? by fschmidt in programming

[–]fschmidt[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Python programmers, help with multithreading? by fschmidt in programming

[–]trident765 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I briefly learned the await crap to debug this one vendor's library that used it. But once I was done debugging this I unlearned it because I didn't see a point to doing concurrent things this way. In practice I find that most concurrent things can be done with the python threading module:

https://realpython.com/intro-to-python-threading/

For GUI stuff I use QThreads.

Python programmers, help with multithreading? by fschmidt in programming

[–]smokeDrugs 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

yep, that sounds right

Python programmers, help with multithreading? by fschmidt in programming

[–]fschmidt[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

What do you use instead of "await"?

Python programmers, help with multithreading? by fschmidt in programming

[–]fschmidt[S] 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I see, so Python threads are really coroutines, right? That still works okay in this case.

How to use TQuery and RequestLive in Delphi 7 ? by developerpublish in programming

[–]SoCo 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I've used TQuery many times...with the older Borland C++.

PHP: a fractal of bad design by zyxzevn in programming

[–]SoCo 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

There is plenty to complain about, I mean a whole lot, but this stance is a bit overboard.

PHP was never meant to be a programming language, just a text templating system. It has done very well to expand much much past its origins, with many annoying vestigials from it's earlier simpler conceptions, like many others with a similar history (ie JavaScript, Python, Lua).

Several of the gripes don't seem very reasonable, like complaining the warning/error handling has too many hierarchical levels of configuration with ini files, the @ symbol, and various error reporting options. The same goes for levels of security options for fopen. There's nothing particularly wrong with being loosely typed, many languages are, and the author seems to enumerate quite a few characteristics of this. In the same way, the author complains a lot about error handling that is a symptom of being an interpreted language (ie not compiled).

Hopefully many of the other complaints are improved by now, as this article was from 2012, provoking a bit of confusion.

In the end, the value of a language isn't any of those strives for perfection; if you are able to quickly create a reliable project, then it is a good language. One must remember, this relies heavily on "you."

Python programmers, help with multithreading? by fschmidt in programming

[–]SoCo 2 insightful - 2 fun2 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

Maybe I'm too used to the older python multitasking patterns, but I cringe when I see "await" used. They scream poor design to me, in most uses.

Python programmers, help with multithreading? by fschmidt in programming

[–]noice 3 insightful - 2 fun3 insightful - 1 fun4 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

Multithreading is modern scum

Python programmers, help with multithreading? by fschmidt in programming

[–]package 3 insightful - 2 fun3 insightful - 1 fun4 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

With what specifically? Multithreading in python is pretty straightforward. Most of the complexity of multithreading is less about the choice of language and more about how to effectively break down a task into independent units.

Python programmers, help with multithreading? by fschmidt in programming

[–]smokeDrugs 2 insightful - 2 fun2 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

Python multi threading is a lie: https://realpython.com/python-gil/ You need multi-processing instead. (maybe it is a good fit for I/O bound tasks, maybe like web requests)

PHP: a fractal of bad design by zyxzevn in programming

[–]smokeDrugs 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

"Sorry that I didn't invent a prettier internet or Facebook or WordPress for you guys." - PHP

PHP: a fractal of bad design by zyxzevn in programming

[–]package 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

PHP is the excel of backend languages

What it takes to be a Good Programmer ? by developerpublish in programming

[–]Gaydolf_Titler 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

HTML is not a programming language, no matter how you slice it. Web development is not application programming, as you cannot program a static page to do nothing.

What it takes to be a Good Programmer ? by developerpublish in programming

[–]AXXA 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Yes. They shouldn't be rendered until the user is ready to navigate. This allows the user to differentiate between content and navigation. It also allows the user to easily find the navigation links.

PHP: a fractal of bad design by zyxzevn in programming

[–]fschmidt 1 insightful - 2 fun1 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

Yes, PHP is horrible. That is why it became so popular.

What it takes to be a Good Programmer ? by developerpublish in programming

[–]fschmidt 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

This doesn't make sense. Should the links in a menu page like this be in a "nav"? If yes, how should it be rendered?

What it takes to be a Good Programmer ? by developerpublish in programming

[–]AXXA 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

The "nav" tag is useless modern crap.

Screen readers use the "nav" tag to determine how to render navigation links.

https://www.w3schools.com/tags/tag_nav.asp

What it takes to be a Good Programmer ? by developerpublish in programming

[–]fschmidt 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

HTML is part of programming, and this image is enough to illustrate revolting modern code. The "nav" tag is useless modern crap. And all those '<a href="#"...' is meaningless modern code, God only knows what those links do.

What it takes to be a Good Programmer ? by developerpublish in programming

[–]Gaydolf_Titler 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

It's unfortunate that the image Senthil used is not one of programming, but of markup language.

8 Javascript quiz that may confuse you by pitayan in programming

[–]fschmidt 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Correct answer

8 Javascript quiz that may confuse you by pitayan in programming

[–]fatman 3 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 0 fun4 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

javascript a shit

8 Javascript quiz that may confuse you by pitayan in programming

[–]AXXA 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

shitty code gives shitty results

Why the fediverse is stuck. by fschmidt in programming

[–]fatman 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Yeah just like subreddits! Look how that turned out.

Why the fediverse is stuck. by fschmidt in programming

[–]fschmidt[S] 2 insightful - 2 fun2 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

I haven't looked at ActivityPub, so I can't judge it. But the basic argument is that ActivityPub is overcomplicated, which is what I expect of anything designed by modern scum. And overcomplicated standards just don't work. This is why almost all standards currently in use were designed before modern culture became fully depraved.

Why the fediverse is stuck. by fschmidt in programming

[–]smokeDrugs 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Like when* Mastodon prevented Gab from existing. Oh wait that didn't happen. Like when Lemmy prevented non-commie instances from existing. Oh wait that didn't happen.

The tools are in place for every instance to do what they want, as it should be.

Why the fediverse is stuck. by fschmidt in programming

[–]smokeDrugs 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Meh, this was a shallow and hyperbolic critique. ActivityPub is essentially the same as SMTP- a domain specific protocol for sending data around.

There were no technical arguments or examples of bad ActivityPub concepts.

Why the fediverse is stuck. by fschmidt in programming

[–]fatman 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Besides the technical points, Fediverse/Mastodon sucks because the network is de-facto operated by a bloc of instances that blacklist any other instances that don't apply enough censorship and enforce liberal ideology over unwitting users.

Why the fediverse is stuck. by fschmidt in programming

[–]LarrySwinger2 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Check out Movim, a social network built on XMPP.

Why Everyone Should Not Learn To Code by TheRealPanzer in programming

[–]platonic1 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

The tech billionaires say so because they want to lower wages.

You want to teach critical thinking? Teach philosophical logic in high school. Let students do proofs in high school

Why Everyone Should Not Learn To Code by TheRealPanzer in programming

[–]SoCo 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Not everyone should learn to be a mechanic, but everyone should probably learn to change a tire, pump gas safely, and maybe some basic maintenance.

...maybe they meant "everyone should learn to code" in a similar context.

Why Everyone Should Not Learn To Code by TheRealPanzer in programming

[–]Evola 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

It's always good to learn different languages if you have the capacity because it gives you different perspectives on how to handle logic and concepts.

Why Everyone Should Not Learn To Code by TheRealPanzer in programming

[–]AntiSemit 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Coding Is Hard

No.

Coding is pathetically easy. Just use the algorithm with the absolute lowest algorithm complexity, which is pathetically easy to derive 100% of the time. Even if you fuck up, guess what: you aren't writing high-end code 99% of the time, otherwise you would have done your research and not fuck up.

Even a 40 IQ Mizrahi Nigger can do it

Why Everyone Should Not Learn To Code by TheRealPanzer in programming

[–]platonic1 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

There's not enough talent to make the innovative CRUD applications of the future. Not even hiring H1B elite programmers are enough. We need to scout out talent, savant children who bleed in binary digits instead of pus whenever they pinch their pimples.

Why Everyone Should Not Learn To Code by TheRealPanzer in programming

[–]package 4 insightful - 3 fun4 insightful - 2 fun5 insightful - 3 fun -  (0 children)

Not everyone, not even the majority of people, have the mental capacity for coding and the vast majority of those that do don’t have any interest in it. Like every other field, there’s no need to encourage people to pursue it as it will naturally attract those that want to.

That said, I knew a guy in college who had been coding since middle school and turned in a final project with over 200 “if else” statements in a row because he couldn’t wrap his head around boolean logic. Now he works at SpaceX.

Reactionary Software (I finished the site today) by fschmidt in programming

[–]zyxzevn 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I still do not see what you mean with "Reacionary software".
Can you explain it differently and give some examples (in text).

I do not know mercurial, but this seems to describe what you mean:
The difference is in the design which reflects completely different values. Git reflects modern values, so it is a disgusting bloated overcomplicated unreliable mess. Mercurial reflects reactionary (older) values, so it is simple, clean, and reliable. Naturally, modern programmers overwhelmingly prefer Git.

It seems that you mean software that is not bloated?

Reactionary Software? by fschmidt in programming

[–]MuhUkraine 1 insightful - 2 fun1 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

muh dependencies

Reactionary Software? by fschmidt in programming

[–]BlueFrost 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I wanted to write my own OS, I think that sounds cool if complex.

Assembly Language is hard by suzew in programming

[–]MuhUkraine 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Assembly language is tedious. I reserve the description "hard" for stuff like debugging a KnockoutJS problem or dealing with some neckbeard's "clever" use of Clojure destructuring.

"If you can't get my unnecessarily complicated crap to work, then the problem is with you" by trident765 in programming

[–]fatman 1 insightful - 3 fun1 insightful - 2 fun2 insightful - 3 fun -  (0 children)

Shut up or I'll put you in an abstract factory... with no constructor

"If you can't get my unnecessarily complicated crap to work, then the problem is with you" by trident765 in programming

[–]MuhUkraine 1 insightful - 2 fun1 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

muh patterns

Reactionary Software? by fschmidt in programming

[–]fatman 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Would you rather have Google and Apple know (and any government who got a warrant)... or would you rather have EVERYBODY know?

Google Protocol Buffers by [deleted] in programming

[–]SoCo 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

These are getting used everywhere. Seems like an overthinking of communications in many applications of it.

Reactionary Software? by fschmidt in programming

[–]LarrySwinger2 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I am not interested in new software.

I meant it more as in installing software that isn't on the computer yet.

The SimpleX Chat that you linked to is a perfect example. It looks like typical modern crap.

They have a client that works inside your terminal. How is that "modern crap"? You can just ignore the mobile apps. Or do you expect mobile apps that don't look modern? Good luck finding that. And Discord itself is the best example of modern crap.

Where can I find matrix chat groups, something like disboard? If no one can find my public chat, then it is useless.

I'll get back to you as I discover the software more. Again, I think you're overvaluing this approach and there's no problem with just promoting your project on existing forums. You'd also be playing a role in a migration toward libre, secure communication platforms by establishing your community there. But it's up to you, of course.

Reactionary Software? by fschmidt in programming

[–]fschmidt[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Their browsing habits are tracked by the browser and sent to Google or Apple, so HTTPS doesn't keep this private.

Reactionary Software? by fschmidt in programming

[–]fatman 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

You won't write 1 line of code to protect your userbase and keep their browsing habits private? As Joe Biden says, "C'mon, man!"

HTTPS is not perfect security of course. But it will prevent an entire class of exploits and snooping techniques.

Reactionary Software? by fschmidt in programming

[–]fschmidt[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Never, of course. This is exactly the kind of pointless complexity that should be rejected. No one is going to bother maliciously modifying my site in-transit.

By the way, my site is implemented in Luan which allows adding HTTPS with 1 line of code, but I still won't do it.

Reactionary Software? by fschmidt in programming

[–]fatman 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

When you gonna put HTTPS in front of your website? On plain old HTTP every middleman who handles this traffic gets to see everything in fulltext (and modify it maliciously while it's in-transit).

It's free and simple to self-sign a SSL certificate and stick it in front of your site.

Reactionary Software? by fschmidt in programming

[–]fatman 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Why does one need a fance build system? I just use "make" or compile all.

When you need to create and distribute self-contained executables for multiple OS that bundles dependencies (and their dependencies, and their dependencies, and resolves conflicts between all of them). In Rust and Go it's simple ... like 'cargo build' or 'go build' and everything is handled. What are you doing? Treading through a hellscape of jar, javac, and god forbid maven or gradle commands and tons of XML files?

Why did you link to JNDI? I replaced Log4j.

Because most java programs use Log4j, and since that JNDI change in 2013, most of those programs were left wide open to remote code execution. This got exploited in the wild at a massive scale. How pathetic... a logging package led to countless people and enterprises getting hacked... java is a piece of shit.

Rust looks really horrible to me. No garbage collection, for example. Also see this.

No garbage collection is a feature IMO. It's just faster. Also the language makes it easy to get rid of your resources, like automatically dropping locks or running destructors when you exit a closure, etc. (This is the Drop trait in Rust)

Reactionary Software? by fschmidt in programming

[–]fschmidt[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I am not interested in new software. Why would I be interested in anything produced by modern scum? The SimpleX Chat that you linked to is a perfect example. It looks like typical modern crap. I would rather just use Skype.

Where can I find matrix chat groups, something like disboard? If no one can find my public chat, then it is useless.

Reactionary Software? by fschmidt in programming

[–]fschmidt[S] 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Why does one need a fancy build system? I just use "make" or compile all.

Why did you link to JNDI? I replaced Log4j.

All modern libs are bloated, you can't blame Java for that. Java with my libs is lean enough.

Rust looks really horrible to me. No garbage collection, for example. Also see this.

Reactionary Software? by fschmidt in programming

[–]LarrySwinger2 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Are you implying programmers aren't interested in new software? Things are ironic, but not that ironic. If they're really interested, they will try it out. Check out this article for someone's experience with this approach.

That being said, matrix has a considerable userbase already. There's also a web client to make the barrier to entry lower (as well as multiple bridges to other networks).

Reactionary Software? by fschmidt in programming

[–]fatman 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Java build system is outdated and painful.

What other languages ran for nearly 10 years with their most common logging package allowing remote code execution?

Java is the only language I have ever used where I import a package for something relatively simple and somehow the entire 4GB heap gets consumed.

Also the code is so verbose , but for what benefit? At least in Rust with the extra verbosity you get guarantees about data races not being possible, etc...

Reactionary Software? by fschmidt in programming

[–]fschmidt[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Practicality means using something that has critical mass (of users). Does anything on the list have this?