Reddit can go [deleted] itself right in the [removed]. by elle_owo_elle in Introductions

[–]magnora7 3 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 0 fun4 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Yes. Welcome to saidit

[X-Post /r/C_S_T] Slavery is the permanent loss of any freedom, not a quality of life, and most people are ok with slavery as long as quality of life is high enough. by happysmash27 in C_S_T

[–]magnora7 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Interesting post. A few months ago I had the idea to make a "levels of freedom chart" like this, and you reminded me of it:

Level 0: Actual slavery

Level 1: Debt slavery

Level 2: Wage slavery

Level 3: Slavery to social pressure

Level 4: Slavery to one's own moods and feelings

Level 5: Slavery to one's own ego (I define ego as the story you tell yourself, about yourself)

Level 6: ??

If air conditioner efficiency improves when it rains outside, why don't all air conditioners include water sprayers to help cool them? by magnora7 in science

[–]magnora7[S] 1 insightful - 2 fun1 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

Just a passing thought, I was wondering if anyone had any ideas.

If air conditioner efficiency improves when it rains outside, why don't all air conditioners include water sprayers to help cool them? by magnora7 in science

[–]magnora7[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

So I looked it up, it takes 2.45 Wh to raise the temperature of one gallon by one degree F. So if the water goes from 80F to 120F, that's 98 Wh. That's remarkably close to the 100 Wh break-even.

So if you had access to cheap water, or had expensive electricity, this might actually save money and use less energy overall. Or if the water delta is more than 40 degrees, that'd made it cost effective too.

If air conditioner efficiency improves when it rains outside, why don't all air conditioners include water sprayers to help cool them? by magnora7 in science

[–]magnora7[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

It's kind of similar but not exactly the same. It's like a combination of both. I never thought of it that way though, interesting link thanks

If air conditioner efficiency improves when it rains outside, why don't all air conditioners include water sprayers to help cool them? by magnora7 in science

[–]magnora7[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Yeah I might get an attic fan, I was looking in to that today too. My temp gun read out 165F on the attic ceiling, and 145F on the floor. Pretty dang hot.

I tried a little experiment and put a gallon of water on the external unit. It cooled it from 140F to 95F, and it evaporated in about 90 seconds because of the heat. Then about 20 minutes later it was back up to 140F.

From a cost perspective, a gallon of water costs 1 cent. 1 cent of electricity is 100Wh. I think it'd be very hard to save 100Wh with one gallon going from 80F to 140F, not sure how many Joules (or watt-hours) that is.

If air conditioner efficiency improves when it rains outside, why don't all air conditioners include water sprayers to help cool them? by magnora7 in science

[–]magnora7[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Haha that's a good idea, I might actually do it with one of those

If air conditioner efficiency improves when it rains outside, why don't all air conditioners include water sprayers to help cool them? by magnora7 in science

[–]magnora7[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Haha I might try it out on my AC. I mean I could literally just spray it with my hose sprayer by hand and measure the efficiency difference I think, to test it out. Then build a little control circuit with one of those electronic water hose switch boxes and a hose to the spigot

If it works that'd be amazing. I guess the efficiency from rain is already proven. It's just a matter of if it's more cost effective for the water use vs energy savings

If air conditioner efficiency improves when it rains outside, why don't all air conditioners include water sprayers to help cool them? by magnora7 in science

[–]magnora7[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Haha. I see what you mean.

I'm simply imagining a small hose that does a tiny mist to simulate rain, just above the outside unit, only while it's running, and only when the outside temp is over 85F.

I think that might avoid the mold issues.

If air conditioner efficiency improves when it rains outside, why don't all air conditioners include water sprayers to help cool them? by magnora7 in science

[–]magnora7[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Good guess but it doesn't work quite like that. It's very interesting, check it out: https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-QXc1_R_aCCg/V3VnKmxM91I/AAAAAAAAARc/0nYP3Gw9niIMJdPSxD_IK0DZFuD64N9MgCLcB/s1600/CR-BG-Central-Air-Browser-Illo.jpg

We're talking about removing heat from the condenser, #3 in the diagram. Which is normally done with just dry air outside, and a fan, and a radiator. But if you sprayed some water on there too, the heat might leave even more quickly...

If air conditioner efficiency improves when it rains outside, why don't all air conditioners include water sprayers to help cool them? by magnora7 in science

[–]magnora7[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Interesting analysis.

Maybe it could only be activated on super-hot days, when the efficiency gains would be particularly high? And the high heat would also guarantee the water would all evaporate quickly so it wouldn't hang around for too long, which seems the source of a lot of the problems.

If air conditioner efficiency improves when it rains outside, why don't all air conditioners include water sprayers to help cool them? by magnora7 in science

[–]magnora7[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

This isn't the part that draws in air though. It's just the part that gets rid of the heat. So even if it filled with mold it wouldn't affect the air supply. The air that you breathe is re-circulated within the house only. But that's a good point about the mold. I guess (I would hope) it would dry out between runs, when it shuts off for 30 minutes or whatever.

If air conditioner efficiency improves when it rains outside, why don't all air conditioners include water sprayers to help cool them? by magnora7 in science

[–]magnora7[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

But just from a cost perspective, if you can use 10 cents of water and save 30 cents of electricity, then that's a net benefit cost-wise. Which means it consumes less energy overall, which is better for the earth