Bimodal Sex by Athelhilda2 in LGBDropTheT

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I think you could argue that within the intersex category, there is most likely a bimodal distribution. There will be a mixture of male and female characteristics, but the majority of individuals in the intersex category will still fall more towards the 'female' or 'male' ends of the spectrums, resulting in 2 peaks. However, outside of this sex is functionally binary because there are two options; male or female. Intersex is not a third sex.

Sam Smith excluded from gendered categories at 2021 Brit awards by Cable in LGBDropTheT

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 3 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 0 fun4 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

The male or female categories are supposed to reflect sex, not gender identity. Technically a male could be included in the male category regardless of 'gender identity' but I suspect they are afraid of 'misgendering' and causing offence.

Facebook censors hydroxychloroquine praise, even in countries where it's an official treatment by scrubking in politics

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Facebook is a privately run social media website. It does not decide healthcare policies of sovereign states so your assertion is hyperbolic nonsense.

Jews are staging a Twitter walkout/protest because a black man has discovered that 78% of slave ships were owned by Jews lol. by kokolokoNightcrawler in news

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 4 insightful - 2 fun4 insightful - 1 fun5 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

Same. I can't find any source for the 78% figure, or even that the majority of slave ships were Jewish owned.

Today on reddit I posted 3 comments on a post on the front page. They were deleted by mods, and to verify my account, I have to send them a picture of my forearm showing my skin color. If my skin is not dark enough, I don't get approved. by magnora7 in MeanwhileOnReddit

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 5 insightful - 2 fun5 insightful - 1 fun6 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

It read it all, they don't explain how they they deem someone to be dark enough to be considered black. There are mixed race people with light skin who might not get through their vetting system.

Fresh questions over BBC impartiality after reporter called for 'clown' Boris Johnson to be sacked by Chipit in MediaAnalysis

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 3 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 0 fun4 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Describing Boris Johnson as a clown isn't an extreme political opinion. Lots of people from both sides of the political spectrum describe his behaviour as buffoonery or clown-like.

If she had described a left-wing politician as a clown, should she have been exempt from being hired? Every single person has political opinions. My main issue is this headline is incredibly misleading as it suggests she was a BBC reporter at the time and didn't specify it was on her own personal account.

Today on reddit I posted 3 comments on a post on the front page. They were deleted by mods, and to verify my account, I have to send them a picture of my forearm showing my skin color. If my skin is not dark enough, I don't get approved. by magnora7 in MeanwhileOnReddit

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 6 insightful - 2 fun6 insightful - 1 fun7 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

How do they decide if your skin is dark enough to be considered black? Surely there is a cut-off point or do they not allow people who are mixed race?

Fresh questions over BBC impartiality after reporter called for 'clown' Boris Johnson to be sacked by Chipit in MediaAnalysis

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 4 insightful - 1 fun4 insightful - 0 fun5 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

This is a non-story. The comment was made on her personal Twitter account before she joined the BBC. Everyone is allowed to have personal political opinions, that doesn't mean they can't adhere to impartiality guidelines.

My physics teacher just announced he’s transgender. by LoganBlade in GenderCritical

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Thanks for the link, I read it but I was looking for evidence from surveys or scientific studies rather than anecdotal evidence. Also to be clear, I accept that some straight MtF’s have ‘autogynephilia’, but having done some more reading the evidence disputes the claim that all straight MtF’s have autogynephilia. This is what I was originally questioning. I’m a scientist by trade so I also ask anyone making surprising claims for evidence. Anyone denying biological sex is just ignorant and I’m firmly against extremist TRA’s who try and invade women only spaces and promote harmful ideology. I’m not sure why you assumed I would be on their side.

Any conclusions gained from transgender studies are obviously contentious, and we need more data to make firm conclusions at present. As a sidenote, I’m also wary of salience bias when it comes to TRAS’s online, because we all tend to notice the loudest, most surreal and most dangerous behaviours and ideas coming from them and this can distort our perception of transgender people in general. I totally understand how spending time on Reddit, Saidit and Twitter etc. can make it seem like the world is full of men pretending to be females for nefarious reasons, but the reality is this is very rare.

Having done some more research, Blanchard’s hypothesis (the idea that all transwomen are either straight men who get turned on by the idea themselves as women, or gay men) doesn’t generally appear to be supported by the scientific literature. There are heaps of valid criticisms of aspects of the hypothesis and studies which refute it [1]. The main rebuttal is the idea that all straight MtF’s experience autogynephilia. While Blanchard’s own studies found that the majority of straight MtF’s experience autogynephilia, they also found that a substantial minority didn’t experience it, directly contradicting the central premise of the hypothesis. Other studies have similar findings (see links in [1]).

There are also problems with how ‘autogynephilia’ (which remember is a term coined by Blanchard) is categorised. For example, if a subject has ever reported, for example, sexual arousal whilst putting on women’s clothing, they might be classed as having autogynephilia, despite these feelings not necessarily being a consistent aspect of their sexuality. One obvious criticism I share is that his earlier research didn’t include controls to assess levels of autogynephilia amongst non-trans people. For example, the majority of straight men might also exhibit some autogynephilic tendencies according to Blanchard’s criteria, but as far as I’m aware we just don’t know. Also, the idea that autogynephilia is exclusive to males is challenged by a study that found that found over 90% of (biological) women experienced autogynephilia (using Blanchard’s criteria).[2]

[1] https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/00918369.2010.486241 [2] https://www.researchgate.net/publication/26660017_Autogynephilia_in_Women

The Peakening ™ - Part 1: The Bad Science on Transgender Issues by mambean in GenderCritical

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I didn't misunderstand the article, I just wanted to highlight some average differences between the sexes in terms of brain science and behaviour. I should have been clearer, I wasn't disagreeing with anything you wrote in section 2 and I think we're on the same page about the science. However, there is a risk someone reading that information might incorrectly think that there are no differences between male and females brains on average, and that any sex differences in behaviour are purely down to culture and socialisation (I've seen this view on this very forum). That's why I chose to also mention hormones and behaviour. The point of the primate studies was to show that biology can, and does, create sex differences in behaviour that are independent of socialisation in very closely related species which we share a common ancestor with. It would hardly be unexpected if we find that some differences in behaviour between the sexes have strong biological roots, but that's not to say that the environment (i.e culture and socialisation) doesn't also play a big role.

My physics teacher just announced he’s transgender. by LoganBlade in GenderCritical

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Can you cite your sources that "AGP is the most common source/cause of "gender dysphoria"? I'm not arguing against it, but I see this claim being made often and it's never backed up by any reputable sources.

Blanchard's hypothesis is as the name suggests; a hypothesis. It's intellectually dishonest at this stage to talk about it as if it's an established theory, even if it may end up being one. As this 2016 review into transgender brain science discusses, the hypothesis is still largely untested and more studies are needed: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4987404/

My physics teacher just announced he’s transgender. by LoganBlade in GenderCritical

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 6 insightful - 1 fun6 insightful - 0 fun7 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Gender dysphoria just means you are unhappy with your gender.

It's not simply being unhappy with your gender, it's usually defined as emotional discomfort because of a mismatch between your sex and gender identity. It's a psychological disorder, and is completely different to being gender non-conforming. I think a lot of people who label themselves as transgender are just gender non-conforming, which is different to having a gender dysphoria.

https://www.psychiatry.org/patients-families/gender-dysphoria/what-is-gender-dysphoria

My physics teacher just announced he’s transgender. by LoganBlade in GenderCritical

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

No need for the condescending tone, I'm just asking for the source. I checked your link, and the statistic isn't actually referenced. Just a claim that "88% percent of the Transgender population are here: The Transvestites, Crossdressers and Autogynephiliacs." I'm not arguing against this statistic, I just want to find the source. The National Center for Transgender Equality is implicated but this isn't actually quoted or properly sourced.

My physics teacher just announced he’s transgender. by LoganBlade in GenderCritical

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 3 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 0 fun4 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Wouldn't that imply that gender dysphoria doesn't exist? While I'm inclined to believe your explanations in some cases, there is plenty of evidence that gender dysphoria is a genuine mental condition.

Are male and female sexuality that stereotypically different? by Mencantbewomen in GenderCritical

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 5 insightful - 1 fun5 insightful - 0 fun6 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

This is actually something I was looking into today! Anecdotally, I find that men are distinctly more visual when it comes to sex and sexual arousal. However, the science seems less clear and contradictory. I might come to a clearer conclusion if I read into it more but this is what I found out so far:

Generally, studies support the idea that men respond more to sexual visual stimuli than women [1]. Also, the type of visual stimuli that men and women respond to seems to be different. For example, a 2013 study found that men tended to be more stimulated by “physical type, directly exposing sexual intercourse and genitalia” whereas women were more stimulated by “mood type, erotic video clips with a concrete story”[2].

However, a more recent 2019 review contradicts the first review I referenced and came to the conclusion that “neuronal response to visual sexual stimuli, contrary to the widely accepted view, is independent of biological sex.” [3]

[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2739403/ [2] https://www.nature.com/articles/ijir201247 [3] https://www.pnas.org/content/116/31/15671

As a side-note, I do wonder suspect such brain imaging studies are limited in terms of answering the question of whether men are more visually oriented when it comes to sex.

My physics teacher just announced he’s transgender. by LoganBlade in GenderCritical

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 11 insightful - 1 fun11 insightful - 0 fun12 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

It is a little different with a TIM, because like as not, they are involving you unwillingly in their sexual fetish. Most of them are getting off sexually to you putting up with their behavior.

That's one hell of a sweeping statement! You seem to be saying that most or all transwomen are trans because of a sexual fetish, and not because of gender dysphoria. While I accept that this is true in some cases, providing some objective sources to back this up your claim would give it some credibility.

My physics teacher just announced he’s transgender. by LoganBlade in GenderCritical

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

This comes across as slightly transphobic in the true sense of the word because you had no problem with this teacher for 6 months, and now he's revealed his gender dysphoria you have an issue with this and don't want him as a teacher anymore. Why does it matter? Also he might have disguised his gender dysphoria for years, many people hide their mental conditions. Unless of course you're arguing that he isn't really transgender, which seems to be the case. If he has nefarious reasons for pretending to be transgender then that's a genuine concern, but I don't know if you're jumping to conclusions here.

The Peakening ™ - Part 1: The Bad Science on Transgender Issues by mambean in GenderCritical

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I find the information here slightly misleading. It's also worth pointing out that Gina Rippon doesn't deny that brain gender differences exist. Also, most scientists compare adult brains because sexual dimorphism is more apparent in post-pubescent individuals. Logically speaking, you would expect some brain sex differences to be more prevalent after puberty.

TL;DR: Science shows there are differences between male and female brains, and in male and female behaviour, on average. These differences have biological roots and are not purely a societal construct. That’s mainly what I’m addressing here and I’ve included references where I can. I'm certainly not saying that the environment has no influence on the phenotype.

Brain structures

On average, males and females do differ in at least 30 morphological brain features. At the same time, there is a lot of variation within each sex; there isn't really such a thing as a 'typical' male or female brain.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/228549134_Gender_Differences_in_Human_Brain_A_Review#:~:text=Male%20brains%20are%20about%2010,more%20neurons%20to%20control%20them

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10508-016-0768-5

Behaviour

There are differences, on average, in male and female behaviour that have biological roots. The environment also has an effect on behaviour and society can reinforce and enhance pre-existing differences. The ideology about sex differences in behaviour being entirely down to socialisation is refuted by science and anthropology. On average, healthy males who have gone through puberty have much higher levels of testosterone compared to a healthy females. Testosterone "activates the subcortical areas of the brain to produce aggression" so it's perhaps not a surprise that men tend to be more aggressive than females.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3693622/#:~:text=Testosterone%20activates%20the%20subcortical%20areas,testosterone%20to%20reduce%20its%20effects.

Sex differences in behaviour exist in other primates too, despite a comparative lack of sex-biased parental care and socialisation:

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/jnr.23862

A review of toy preferences in human infants shows that there are clear consistent differences between males and females at a young age.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10508-019-01624-7#Sec56

There are people who unironically believe that biological sex is a social construct now by apfelkoenig in LGBDropTheT

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 11 insightful - 1 fun11 insightful - 0 fun12 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

"Squirtingisntpee" says it all really :p Biological sex is real and squirting is mostly watered down pee.

https://www.healthline.com/health/healthy-sex/female-ejaculation

Giggle app moves to become female only after feedback. If TiMs are reported they will be removed. by jet199 in GenderCritical

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 1 insightful - 4 fun1 insightful - 3 fun2 insightful - 4 fun -  (0 children)

Personally I don't think a social networking app that excludes 50% of the population is a healthy thing for the users or for society as a whole. A female-only echo chamber does not address real-world problems associated with men. In the same way, a male-only app would create a male-only echo chamber that wouldn't be healthy.

Question: why are men more likely to commit crimes? by sosorreal in GenderCritical

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Thanks for the link for the review paper, I'll have a better look when I get chance. Although, the abstract does echo what I wrote in my first post:

"Although there are sex/gender differences in brain and behavior, humans and human brains are comprised of unique “mosaics” of features, some more common in females compared with males, some more common in males compared with females, and some common in both females and males. Our results demonstrate that regardless of the cause of observed sex/gender differences in brain and behavior (nature or nurture), human brains cannot be categorized into two distinct classes: male brain/female brain."

There's still a lot we don't understand when it comes to neuroscience, although from my understanding there are certain areas that are more in flux than others. The point you make about plasticity and how the environment might cause sex brain differences is an interesting one and something I haven't read a lot into. It's possible that pressure to conform to gender stereotypes for example, might cause changes in the brain and account for some of these differences. Having said that, the evidence for innate biological differences is very strong so the interesting question from my perspective would be to what extent does the environment act on these innate differences.

Question: why are men more likely to commit crimes? by sosorreal in GenderCritical

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 5 insightful - 1 fun5 insightful - 0 fun6 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I don't know any males who think that men are better than females. And trust me...they would have told me if that was the case. That's not to say that male supremacy doesn't exist, but it's not as common as you suggest. Feel free to back it up your assertion with some studies.

"No, I'm certain that testosterone has ziltch to do with male violence" Really, you're certain? You think you know better than empirical, objective evidence? In that case, I'm not going to waste anymore of my time here, apart from to point out one thing:

"if you believe that, aren't you offering men an excuse for their violence"

No, being naturally more aggressive than another person doesn't excuse violence, in the same way that having a high sex drive doesn't excuse rape. People can control their urges.

Twitter is permanently banning users who say females get cervical cancer by Heteronormativefuckt in GenderCritical

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 3 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 0 fun4 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I'm not denying this isn't true but where's your evidence?

Question: why are men more likely to commit crimes? by sosorreal in GenderCritical

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Have fun! There are probably some better resources out there, but these were the best reviews I could find for the time being. You can also get a good overview from just reading the abstract or discussion/conclusion.

Question: why are men more likely to commit crimes? by sosorreal in GenderCritical

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 5 insightful - 1 fun5 insightful - 0 fun6 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Just a massive coincidence that males have higher levels of testosterone, and testosterone interacts with the brain to cause aggression then? Also a massive coincidence that almost all societies across the world today, and historically, are male-dominated and this has nothing to do with biology?

Question: why are men more likely to commit crimes? by sosorreal in GenderCritical

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 7 insightful - 1 fun7 insightful - 0 fun8 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

"men and women have different brains, as that becomes a slippery slope. But... is it the hormones? The reason I'm asking is because we seem to all agree that men are more violent, which is why we don't want them in our spaces"

On average, males and females do differ in at least 30 morphological brain features. That's not a slippery slope, that's just empirical data about measurable differences. At the same time, there is a lot of variation within each sex; there isn't really such a thing as a 'typical' male or female brain.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/228549134_Gender_Differences_in_Human_Brain_A_Review#:~:text=Male%20brains%20are%20about%2010,more%20neurons%20to%20control%20them.

On average, healthy males who have gone through puberty have much higher levels of testosterone compared to a healthy females. Testosterone "activates the subcortical areas of the brain to produce aggression" so it's perhaps not a surprise that men tend to be more aggressive than females.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3693622/#:~:text=Testosterone%20activates%20the%20subcortical%20areas,testosterone%20to%20reduce%20its%20effects.

There may be differences between brain structures that also account for differences in aggression, but I don't have any resources on that.

Please note: There are some horrible misinterpretations of the science to fit particular agendas. If you want to understand what science says about gender and sex, don't get it from a radfem source, as you'll most likely get a biased interpretation. I've even seen a lot of bias on blogs and articles that don't have an obvious agenda. If possible, read scientific reviews for a good overview and avoid science from popular sources.

Edit: There are differences, on average between male and female behaviour that have biological roots. Of course the environment also has an effect on behaviour and society can reinforce and enhance preexisting differences. The ideology about sex differences in behaviour being entirely down to socialisation is completely refuted by science. Sex differences in behaviour exist in other primates too, despite a comparative lack of sex-biased parental care and socialisation:

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/jnr.23862

Review of toy preferences in human infants: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10508-019-01624-7#Sec56

An offering of some of my favorite links used to argue facts with TRAs by CaliforniGinger in GenderCritical

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 3 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 0 fun4 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Another important one: Transgender people's brains do not match the sex to which they identify with, a 2016 review of many studies into transgender brain structures: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10508-016-0768-5

Note: There does appear to be a certain brain phenotype associated with transgender people, but it's important to note this is after hormone treatment. Most of the studies in the review have post-hormone treatment subjects. There is one study in that review that did include pre-hormone subjects, concluded that "their data did not support the notion that the nonhomosexual MtF brain was feminized", although interestingly "the cortex of nonhomosexual MtFs presents morphological peculiarities in regions in which male and female controls do not differ."

So does anyone actually understand gender theory? by bi_otter in LGBDropTheT

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 3 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 0 fun4 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

While it's tempting to believe that gendered behaviour and gender stereotypes don't have any biological roots, this is strongly refuted by science. What is disputed is the extent to which society reinforces or exaggerates innate differences that exist on average between the sexes.

So does anyone actually understand gender theory? by bi_otter in LGBDropTheT

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

As you allude to, I think 'gender identity' has shifted away from commonly accepted definitions of gender. Gender, by most definitions, is binary, because it's a way of describing 'masculine' and 'feminine' things. These are the only 2 defined parameters. On the other hand, 'gender identity' is now used to just mean 'personal identity', hence the infinite number of genders. Now people who are gender non-conforming are told they might be transgender, or might be non-binary, or an infinite number of identifiers. This doesn't help to fight against gender stereotypes and gender roles, it reinforces them. This is different to gender dysphoria which appears to be a mental condition.

So does anyone actually understand gender theory? by bi_otter in LGBDropTheT

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 4 insightful - 1 fun4 insightful - 0 fun5 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I think the answer is easiest to understand from a more objective, scientific perspective, which I've attempted to summarise from the best of my knowledge:

While usually described as a social construct, there is also a biological basis to gender. There are 'masculine' and 'feminine' characteristics which relate to physical features. There are clear differences between male and female bodies, for example. On average, there are are also differences between male and female brains, although these differences are very small. There is a huge amount of variation within each sex and there is not really such a thing as a 'typical male' or 'typical female' brain. Nevertheless, on average, there are differences in behaviour between males and females. These differences are innate, but they are also reinforced and sometimes enhanced by society. There is also a ton of evidence for innate gender behaviour differences, on average, in other animals such as primates. The idea that 'gendered behaviour' is purely a result of socialisation and culture is refuted by science.

Some interesting views from Reddit r/LGBT on what this sub was about after the ban by snub-nosedmonkey in LGBDropTheT

[–]snub-nosedmonkey[S] 19 insightful - 8 fun19 insightful - 7 fun20 insightful - 8 fun -  (0 children)

My favourite is the (popular) idea that we're all far-right Christians 🤣

All of those who are celebrating the ban of r/lgbdropthet are objectively homophobic; they are celebrating the erasure of gay, lesbian and bisexual people, along with their culture. Imagine turning on the people who made your fucking community. You weren't asked to force yourselves into our group. by Smolders1 in LGBDropTheT

[–]snub-nosedmonkey 14 insightful - 2 fun14 insightful - 1 fun15 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

I honestly think TRA's are far less organised and self-aware than many on here believe. There is a conspiracy theory that all extreme TRA's are trying to erase gay, lesbian and bisexual people as some kind of planned, organised endgame. That gives them far too much credit! In the vast majority of cases, I believe extreme TRA's start off being well-intentioned, but are then brainwashed into an ideology that inclusiveness and validation is more important than anything in the LGBT community. They don't realise the effects of their ideology, and they think they are the good guys, the tolerant and virtuous ones defending transgender people. It's like a religion, they are just sheep following an ideology that got out of hand.