all 14 comments

[–]Tom_Bombadil 3 insightful - 3 fun3 insightful - 2 fun4 insightful - 3 fun -  (0 children)

Those crazy Khmer.

[–]SierraKiloBravo 2 insightful - 2 fun2 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

Beautiful

[–]Entropick 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (11 children)

what an amazing structure

[–]hennaojisan 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (10 children)

Like the Great Pyramid, it is aligned to the cardinal points of the compass and according to Graham Hancock seems to be pointing us to some event about 13,000 years ago, just as Gobekli Tepe is.

[–]Tom_Bombadil 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (9 children)

Really? I though it was only about 1000 years old.

That's the end of the ice age period. Very interesting.

[–]hennaojisan 3 insightful - 2 fun3 insightful - 1 fun4 insightful - 2 fun -  (8 children)

I didn't explain very well. It is only about 800 years old but according to Hancock's research, it is built in such a way that it seems to be telling us about some event that happened about 13,000 years ago. That would probably be when a comet hit the earth, according to him, and the following flood. The flood is not only mentioned in the Bible but in the myths of nearly 200 cultures around the world. If 200 cultures mention a flood then it's likely there was a flood at some point. The comet caused melting of the northern ice caps and all that water running around carved out the landscapes that you see in West Texas and many other places. He said not all humans were killed. The ones who survived built Gobleki Tepe to warn future generations that comet fragments are still orbiting the sun and will probably hit us again fairly soon.

[–]Tom_Bombadil 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (7 children)

I don't think the cataclysm was caused by a comet.

I think it was caused by a Solar Induced Dark Age event.

A large enough SIDA outburst could literally melt the glacial caps within in days.

This seems like the most plausible explanation, given the cyclic nature of recent ice ages and the absence of impact craters or volcanoes during the ice age climate shifts.

Check out the link. My mind was blown the first time I heard of this, cause it makes a lot of sense.

This should be public knowledge.

[–]hennaojisan 2 insightful - 2 fun2 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 2 fun -  (6 children)

I think you're right Tom. Schoch's theory makes more sense to me—a layman—than Hancock's. One thing for sure, a hellacious event took place about 13,000 years ago (13,000 BP) and people back then were trying to warn us that it will happen again. Apparently, some of the cultures before the event had technologies beyond what we have today, thus they could build the Pyramids and Sacsayhuaman, Peru but today engineers say we couldn't. But you know that. Thanks. (I'm not discounting the body of excellent work done by Hancock but on this point he seems to be off.)

[–]Tom_Bombadil 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (5 children)

Thanks ;-).

Here's some more links to similar material If you're interested.

I recommend these in this order.
https://m.soundcloud.com/guns-and-butter-1/space-weather-and-earthquakes-ben-davidson-364

.

You should listen to the one below second, but it's the most important one in my opinion. Another SIDA is probably headed our way in the next hundred years. It could be within our lifetimes....

This podcast provides some compelling evidence...
:-/.

(https://m.soundcloud.com/guns-and-butter-1/solar-grand-minimums-magnetic-reversals-and-ice-ages-ben-davidson-365)

This one is a thought provoking piece. The scientific community isn't interested in investigating this topic, because it sounds too far fetched.

However, some of the questions that he raised cannot be explained with the current understandings of geology.

https://m.soundcloud.com/guns-and-butter-1/plasma-catastrophist-geology-michael-steinbacher-328

I'd love to hear your thoughts.

[–]hennaojisan 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (1 child)

I haven't listened yet but a couple of comments: Hancock also says the Event might happen as early as within twenty years, but we're coming into the zone.

Did you read in the news that there is an opening on the sun's surface that will be facing directly toward Earth starting right about now. It happens every century or so—not the end of the world, I hope.

I think there is no reason to get upset about that. It might be nothing, but in 1859 a solar disturbance knocked out telegraph systems all over the world. So most likely it is just a Y2K thing and it will only last a couple of days. Just a case of media trying to terrify us. I only saw that news on Drudge Report. [No, I read it on Saidit. I've got a mind like a rusty steel trap.]

I've been to Angkor Wat four times. Used to live in Bangkok and it's a fifty-five-minute flight but they still manage to feed you a sandwich. Maybe I'll post a couple of pics I took but will be busy the next few days.

I will listen soon but have to cook for myself this evening.

[–]Tom_Bombadil 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Did you read in the news that there is an opening on the sun's surface that will be facing directly toward Earth starting right about now. It happens every century or so—not the end of the world, I hope.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SbLf0Wq1tug

It's nothing to worry about

in 1859 a solar disturbance knocked out telegraph systems all over the world.

Carrington event.

Yeah, I think we'll see a mega version of think the next 100 yrs.

[–]hennaojisan 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (2 children)

Why four times? Even though I was working legally in Bangkok, I couldn't get a working visa back in the 19th century. :) So the usual thing was to fly to another country—in my case Cambodia—every two months and get my tourist visa renewed. Now I'm gonna listen.

[–]Tom_Bombadil 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Nice planning! ;-)

[–]hennaojisan 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I listened to your first link but have to get to sleep really early tonight. (Personal information warning: my wife is having minor surgery at eight AM tomorrow and I want to be there.) I'll listen to the other two tomorrow.

I want to emphasize that I'm a layman so if anyone wants to weigh in on this, please do.

The eleven-year sunspot cycle is a very real, well-known pattern. In junior high, I got an amateur radio license and it was a couple of years before the peak of the cycle. You could easily see the sunspots using a telescope with the right filter. Then the shortwave radio frequencies were alive with activity and even with a ninety-watt transmitter I contacted other amateurs in Australia, Africa, and Europe regularly. Now we have the Internet so there are fewer shortwave broadcasts but I still have a shortwave radio—not the ham license anymore—and it is easy to tell that we are near the eleven-year minimum of the cycle. Davidson is exactly right about that.

Who is Davidson? I don't know but he's not an academic or he would say so. Being an academic is a kind of double-edged sword. You have qualifications but you had better watch what you say or you will lose that nice job you have. If you make claims outside those generally accepted in your field, it gets risky. For example "Egyptologists" insist that the Great Pyramid and the Sphinx are about 3,500 years old but a well-read layman knows they are considerably older. We already talked about Gobleki Tepe that was built about 13,000 BP. Academia is very conservative. So in Davidson's case, his not being an academic cuts both ways: he is freer to make claims but is he really qualified? He sounds like it but I can't be sure on a lot of his points.

I agree with him that so-called global warming and the greenhouse effect are just not true and if you search for it you'll find some Nobel Prize winners who come out and say just that. Usually, they are older academics near the end of their careers and have nothing to lose. Some of them say we're entering a minor ice age as Davidson does.

Polar drift and shifts: People way more qualified than me have been talking about this for a long time. There is a lot of evidence that Antarctica was at one time sub-tropical.

He talks about the Bermuda Triangle that we've all heard of but I dismissed that a long time ago however I could be wrong. Lots of ships and some planes have disappeared in that area but it is one of the busiest areas in the world for shipping and air traffic. I'm open to proof that it is a fact but frankly I doubt it. He also mentions the Dragon's Triangle in Asia but I have never even heard of that after living over half my life in Asia. But I need to look at his websites before deciding on this.

Global cooling caused by volcanic dust clouds: If you've heard of Krakatoa, the massive eruption that happened in 1883, then you probably know it caused global cooling for at least two years worldwide. Davidson mentions the same area—between Java and Sumatra— but doesn't mention Krakatoa, maybe because of time constraints.

To be honest, I'm not sure if he is for real or trying to sell books. More research is needed, for me I mean.

Speculation: What if a few governments around the world knew what Davidson is saying is right and some cataclysm is just around the corner? Would they tell us ordinary people? I doubt it. Have you heard of Deep Underground Military Bases (DUMBs)? Some good evidence suggests that they are real, but are they to protect the lucky few in the event of a nuclear war or in the event of the polar shift Davidson is talking about? Damned if I know.

Tomorrow I will listen to the other two and probably give you shorter answers than this one.

Nice talking to you Tom.