all 6 comments

[–]HongKongPhooey 3 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 0 fun4 insightful - 1 fun -  (2 children)

I don't know about the veracity of this study.

  1. They don't show causation. It is probably that people who are depressed to begin with are more likely to have used LSD in the past year.

  2. It was published in the Journal of Addictive Behaviors, a highly biased source

[–]Drewski[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (1 child)

Yeah, I haven't looked into it in depth. I am generally pro-psychedelic so I like to post some content like this as a counter balance.

[–]HongKongPhooey 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Yeah, I haven't looked into it in depth. I am generally pro-psychedelic so I like to post some content like this as a counter balance.

Totally, I've appreciated your posts on psychedelic research (you post some great stuff in general), and agree it is good to disseminate all the studies on a topic where we really need more data. I haven't read the full study yet either, just wanted the readers to approach this with a healthy level of skepticism given the Journal in question, and remind people that correlation is not causation.

[–]magnora7 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Are LSD and salvia more likely to make people depressed? Or are depressed people more likely to want to take LSD and salvia?

I'm guessing it's the latter.

[–]Drewski[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

[–]IkeConn 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Try beer and THC.