The footprint of a Roman toddler has been preserved on this tile for 2000 years. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]JasonCarswell 2 insightful - 2 fun2 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

How much you need? Actually all I need to be painless and over is some critical punctures with or after a knockout blow. I could hold the second trigger that is released with my consciousness.

The footprint of a Roman toddler has been preserved on this tile for 2000 years. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]umad 2 insightful - 5 fun2 insightful - 4 fun3 insightful - 5 fun -  (0 children)

That's why I lay my pipe across all the wet cement I can find. Future generations will look on it and think "well, it's only an inch long but he must've gone like a sewing machine!"

The footprint of a Roman toddler has been preserved on this tile for 2000 years. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]flugegeheimen 2 insightful - 3 fun2 insightful - 2 fun3 insightful - 3 fun -  (0 children)

So, even 2000 years ago you couldn't get a concrete\clay\whatever surface to harden without random dumb kids, drunks or animals leaving their traces.

The footprint of a Roman toddler has been preserved on this tile for 2000 years. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]C3P0 2 insightful - 2 fun2 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

I'm not sure if a wooden guillotine would do the job. Maybe a third of the job.

The footprint of a Roman toddler has been preserved on this tile for 2000 years. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]JasonCarswell 1 insightful - 3 fun1 insightful - 2 fun2 insightful - 3 fun -  (0 children)

You'll have to out-bid Trump for the rights.

The footprint of a Roman toddler has been preserved on this tile for 2000 years. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]JasonCarswell 3 insightful - 3 fun3 insightful - 2 fun4 insightful - 3 fun -  (0 children)

I intend to build a giant funeral pyre out of the most eco-friendly materials I can find, hang a non-nylon natural fiber (maybe hemp) rope over it, and when the time is right I'll light the pyre but hang myself before it really gets going, then my body will drop into the fire to be cremated. I won't be polluting the environment, but I'm not afraid to release carbon because that's a fucking scam. Also, I might do a lot of crazy ass shenanigans before I go so the government will be forever searching for me. But first I have to get old as fuck to the point where the suffering is greater than the joy and meaning in my life. I'm not going to suffer into oblivion. Also, before I hang myself I'll likely have some kind of drug-fueled last blast - if I can afford it in the dystopian apocalypse. Also also, I'd rather have a guillotine than a noose - so maybe I can make a good wooden blade or something and burn the whole thing. Maybe build something like those killer traps in the movie Predator. I've got some time to plan...

The footprint of a Roman toddler has been preserved on this tile for 2000 years. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]JasonCarswell 2 insightful - 2 fun2 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

Actually it's a baby bigfoot.

The footprint of a Roman toddler has been preserved on this tile for 2000 years. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]Sixto 3 insightful - 2 fun3 insightful - 1 fun4 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

That's why I aspire to laser-engrave my face onto the moon.

REMEMBER ME!

The footprint of a Roman toddler has been preserved on this tile for 2000 years. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]C3P0 4 insightful - 2 fun4 insightful - 1 fun5 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

And when we're gone, most of us probably won't have any humanly trace left over.

Scientists find origin source of larger Stonehenge pieces by Vigte in history

[–]ABlueSkilttle 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Ah, well, I agree with you on that point. "Popular science" or science reporting is hot fucking garbage.

Scientists find origin source of larger Stonehenge pieces by Vigte in history

[–]slushpilot 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Oh, I wasn't dismissing it. I just think the popular coverage of science stuff is always a bit too light. (Would be great to read something a little more in-depth, but not necessarily the full academic paper.)

Scientists find origin source of larger Stonehenge pieces by Vigte in history

[–]ABlueSkilttle 3 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 0 fun4 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Not knowing how something is done is not grounds to dismiss it. They destroyed the core sample in an analysis process to gather defining signatures that could then be non-destructively compared to the other structures. There are many times where this kind of thing is done throughout archaeology and many different techniques involved. If you are curious, these days all you ever wanted to know is just a search for a study away.

Personally I do not know what method was used in this particular test. However, detailed spectroscopy can also accomplish such things, called "Spectral geology". Probably not what was done here, but one of many possible methods.

Scientists find origin source of larger Stonehenge pieces by Vigte in history

[–]Vigte[S] 2 insightful - 2 fun2 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

By the power of PH.D! (appeal to authority mixed with willful ignorance/assumptions that all of them are the same).

That's what I figure at least.

Scientists find origin source of larger Stonehenge pieces by Vigte in history

[–]slushpilot 4 insightful - 2 fun4 insightful - 1 fun5 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

Cool. I do wish these articles went into a little more detail though.

A (single) sarsen core sample, extracted during conservation work in the late 1950s when metal rods were inserted to stabilize a cracked megalith, provided crucial information.

The researchers analyzed fragments of the sample - destructive testing being off limits for megaliths at the site

That fingerprint matched sandstone still at West Woods and all but two of the Stonehenge sarsens.

I just don't understand how they made this determination:

  1. Single core sample
  2. Matches all but two of 52 sarsens

How??

Scientists find origin source of larger Stonehenge pieces by Vigte in history

[–]Vigte[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Not that I'll necessarily believe anything the labcoats push on us - it's interesting to keep note of.

tl;dr

Geochemical testing indicates that 50 of Stonehenge's 52 pale-gray sandstone megaliths, known as sarsens, share a common origin about 15 miles (25 km) away at a site called West Woods on the edge of Wiltshire's Marlborough Downs

and

Stonehenge's smaller bluestones previously were traced to Pembrokeshire in Wales 150 miles (250 km) away

A group of archaeologists discovered a claw from a moa (with muscles and flesh intact) while digging in a cave in New Zealand. Moa’s became extinct 700 - 800 years ago. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]hajamieli 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

In other words, you're pulling crackpot theories straight out of your ass backed by nothing but your shit.

A group of archaeologists discovered a claw from a moa (with muscles and flesh intact) while digging in a cave in New Zealand. Moa’s became extinct 700 - 800 years ago. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]iraelmossadreddit 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

repeated history of british fucking shit up and lying about it changing history...

A group of archaeologists discovered a claw from a moa (with muscles and flesh intact) while digging in a cave in New Zealand. Moa’s became extinct 700 - 800 years ago. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]hajamieli 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Then what supports your claim? It seems to directly contradict what experts say about it and you've not presented anything to support it.

A group of archaeologists discovered a claw from a moa (with muscles and flesh intact) while digging in a cave in New Zealand. Moa’s became extinct 700 - 800 years ago. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]MrZak 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

The maori's won the first maori war you fucking dumbass.

A group of archaeologists discovered a claw from a moa (with muscles and flesh intact) while digging in a cave in New Zealand. Moa’s became extinct 700 - 800 years ago. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]iraelmossadreddit 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

or they shot flaming cannon balls from the sea.. I read they were easy to kill because they fed them hot lava rocks...sure...

then when that wasn't enough they gave the locals enemy tribes muskets to raid them...

A group of archaeologists discovered a claw from a moa (with muscles and flesh intact) while digging in a cave in New Zealand. Moa’s became extinct 700 - 800 years ago. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]hajamieli 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Your article does not support your claim, quite the opposite. Did you even read the abstract? Previous estimates was that the Maori population wouldn't have exceeded 5000 before they exterminated the Moa, whereas this study shows it'd have been earlier and by just 2000 or fewer Maori.

A group of archaeologists discovered a claw from a moa (with muscles and flesh intact) while digging in a cave in New Zealand. Moa’s became extinct 700 - 800 years ago. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]MrZak 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Interesting stuff, I had always been told the reason large chunks of NZ are deforested are because the maori would burn back forests to flush out moa and other animals.

A French vision of Europe after WWI, 1916 by Jashfior in history

[–]Whuchurface 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

france exists

Disgusting

Surprise cave discoveries may double the time people lived in the Americas by Vigte in history

[–]RasputinsDong 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Thanks that was really interesting.

A group of archaeologists discovered a claw from a moa (with muscles and flesh intact) while digging in a cave in New Zealand. Moa’s became extinct 700 - 800 years ago. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]iraelmossadreddit 1 insightful - 2 fun1 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

I don't know if I buy that story. I have seen the date of extiction ranging from 1455 all the way up to 1500 something. It seems like they are purposedly setting the date before the british came over to make it look like they didn't kill them. they had to remove a huge food source from the natives to control them just like they did with the buffalo... "an extremely low population exterminated the moa" yeah right... https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms6436

polynesian population of New Zealand would not have exceeded 2,000 individuals before extinction of moa

A group of archaeologists discovered a claw from a moa (with muscles and flesh intact) while digging in a cave in New Zealand. Moa’s became extinct 700 - 800 years ago. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]MrZak 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Fun fact, the overhunting and exctinction of moa by the maori's and the scarcity of recources it created is one of the reasons that Maori culture was so much more technically advanced then other societies when europeans arrived.

History Killers: The Academic Fraudulence of the 1619 Project by sproketboy in history

[–]sproketboy[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Good discussion by the author https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cSlnHHDEgvQ

A group of archaeologists discovered a claw from a moa (with muscles and flesh intact) while digging in a cave in New Zealand. Moa’s became extinct 700 - 800 years ago. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]SierraKiloBravo[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

In the movie in my head a cloned one escapes the lab and slowly picks off hikers in the South Island bush

A group of archaeologists discovered a claw from a moa (with muscles and flesh intact) while digging in a cave in New Zealand. Moa’s became extinct 700 - 800 years ago. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]Sw0rdofDam0cles 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

It would be awesome if they cloned them and let them run amok. It could be like the Emu war in Australia. However, I doubt any cloned Moa's will grow to be as large as they were before the Maori showed up to wipe them out.

A group of archaeologists discovered a claw from a moa (with muscles and flesh intact) while digging in a cave in New Zealand. Moa’s became extinct 700 - 800 years ago. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]philosopher 5 insightful - 7 fun5 insightful - 6 fun6 insightful - 7 fun -  (0 children)

If we could grab some DNA, then maybe we could make Moa of them

Surprise cave discoveries may double the time people lived in the Americas by Vigte in history

[–]Vigte[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Surprise cave discoveries may double the time people lived in the Americas by Vigte in history

[–]RasputinsDong 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I just want to read the article, not create an account on your stupid website NatGeo

Surprise cave discoveries may double the time people lived in the Americas by Vigte in history

[–]Vigte[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I really hate how if you said this literally last year, people said you were a "pseudo-scientist" or at worst, a "racist".

Now, it's just another discovery they'll take credit for and never apologize for being wrong about - and people wonder why I hold modern scientists in the highest contempt.

Ševčenko's law describing historians as dogs pissing at high frequency and accuracy on similar sets of trees despite the entire forest of general historical coverage available. by Ephemeral in history

[–]Ephemeral[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I understand your issue with these ideas. I attempt to keep in mind he wrote the first version of this book in 1933 and writing about the earlier Russian Revolution. He is writing of a very different world than the one we live in.

Gravestone for Dambusters Dog Replaced Due to Racist Name by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]Earendil 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Thank you

Gravestone for Dambusters Dog Replaced Due to Racist Name by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]MrZak 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Go fuck yourself

Ševčenko's law describing historians as dogs pissing at high frequency and accuracy on similar sets of trees despite the entire forest of general historical coverage available. by Ephemeral in history

[–]Earendil 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I am enjoying the Mass Psychology pdf. It's quite the read, so I'm not finished with it yet. I read something that kind of bothered me, and I wanted to put it up here. The writer says that old ideas get replaced by better ideas, basically by passing through the gauntlet of rigorous study. He says " the Marxist "consciousness" was replaced by "dynamic structure," "needs" by "orgonotic instinctual processes," "tradition" by "biological and characterological rigidity," etc." Who has the right to say tradition is gone and is now simply "biological and characterological rigidity"? That seems to me like a subtle changing of a concept to mean something more reductionist. Same with consciousness.

F.B.I. Documents On Smedley Butler by CompleteDoubterII in history

[–]CompleteDoubterII[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Also posted this on Notabug.

Ševčenko's law describing historians as dogs pissing at high frequency and accuracy on similar sets of trees despite the entire forest of general historical coverage available. by Ephemeral in history

[–]Ephemeral[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I take it as we are ether unhealthy or was heading that way when From wrote the book. I think he put the question to the test in the book, yet didn't answer the question, just what would a sane society look like and does the one I am in look more sane or insane?

Here are two more selections for you and these might help you decide wether America is sane or insane. https://lorage.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/Wilhelm-Reich-The-Mass-Psychology-of-Fascism-Farrar-Straus-Giroux-1980.pdf

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJ3RzGoQC4s

enjoy

Ševčenko's law describing historians as dogs pissing at high frequency and accuracy on similar sets of trees despite the entire forest of general historical coverage available. by Ephemeral in history

[–]Ephemeral[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

You are welcome, I read it some thirty years ago and was impressed by his ability to write and the subject matter.

Ševčenko's law describing historians as dogs pissing at high frequency and accuracy on similar sets of trees despite the entire forest of general historical coverage available. by Ephemeral in history

[–]Earendil 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I just wanted to say that I am really enjoying the Sane Society article. Thank you for putting it up here.

Ševčenko's law describing historians as dogs pissing at high frequency and accuracy on similar sets of trees despite the entire forest of general historical coverage available. by Ephemeral in history

[–]Earendil 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

The first article seems to make the argument at the end that America has avoided pitfalls by looking at history. The link to that Sane Society book describes how capitalism makes people think in unhealthy ways. I agree with the conclusion, but are they saying that America is then unhealthy since it so obviously promotes capitalistic tendencies as being positive?

Gravestone for Dambusters Dog Replaced Due to Racist Name by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]Earendil 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Dude, where are you coming from with this divisive comment? Extremely antagonistic, which is your goal, I'm sure. I hope no one responds with more vitriol.

Gravestone for Dambusters Dog Replaced Due to Racist Name by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]Earendil 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

the point is to make people believe that we've always been this great from the start, and the only things we will remember as bad will be people like us who will claim of a dirtier history than what is sold in school.

Gravestone for Dambusters Dog Replaced Due to Racist Name by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]NiceDickBro 3 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 0 fun4 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Yes yes big bad n word bad word, I think these people fail to realise how common of a word it actually was to describe things back then, I remember growing up my grandma baking “Nigger Balls” which were fucking amazing, other grandparents had a dog with the same name. Probably to honour the og from the war.

Yes you shouldn’t say it now, but to deny it ever was used in such a common way is to deny our history - fuck sakes how are we going to see how we’ve progressed as a society if everything we look back on is doctored?

Gravestone for Dambusters Dog Replaced Due to Racist Name by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]NiceDickBro 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Because that’s a sensible opinion that the majority has... for some reason we let these retards who are vocally offended on everyone else’s behalves call the shots on these things.

Gravestone for Dambusters Dog Replaced Due to Racist Name by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]SierraKiloBravo[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Yes, this is just another "we did it boys, we solved racism!" moment. It would be far more effective, IMO, to use it as a teaching tool ("look how far we've come" etc) than to just delete it. How can we learn from the past if the past has been edited to be all smooth and shiny?

I thought the company that was tasked with the replacement job put it succinctly.

Gravestone for Dambusters Dog Replaced Due to Racist Name by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]Caffinatedllama 3 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 0 fun4 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Why not use this as an opportunity to explain the racism of the past? Why can't this be used as a teaching tool? Why do we have to get rid of all the shitty things humans do? Maybe it would be helpful for people to learn about the growth a culture can achieve. Maybe it would be useful as a tool to help people explore some of their own prejudices and grow to become better. Do the people who had this memorial changed think they somehow changed history. The dog was named nigger. That isn't nice but it is reality. His name wasn't magically changed to Spot because they changed the memorial.

Sometimes the stupidity of other people's children is amazing.

Gravestone for Dambusters Dog Replaced Due to Racist Name by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]MrZak 1 insightful - 3 fun1 insightful - 2 fun2 insightful - 3 fun -  (0 children)

Ironically Nigger the dog had more contributions to society than any actual niggers.

Gravestone for Dambusters Dog Replaced Due to Racist Name by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]soyboy77 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

wtf.exe

Pearl Harbor Warning – America’s Ambassador to Japan Raised the Alarm That War Was Coming. Why Was He Ignored? - MilitaryHistoryNow.com by christnmusicreleases in history

[–]christnmusicreleases[S] 1 insightful - 2 fun1 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

Alt news is warning you about the coming war with China... is it a couple weeks away?

Mark Twain's 1898 Harper’s essay “Concerning the Jews.” He wrote about what might happen should “the cunningest brains in the world” find political cohesion: “It will not be well to let the race find out its strength. If the horses knew theirs, we should not ride any more.” by Chipit in history

[–]Chipit[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

It's more a matter of who benefits. Our society used to be run to benefit ourselves. People at the top saw themselves as one of us. They practiced noblesse oblige.

Now, they despise us, and practice noblesse malice. A huge difference.

Mark Twain's 1898 Harper’s essay “Concerning the Jews.” He wrote about what might happen should “the cunningest brains in the world” find political cohesion: “It will not be well to let the race find out its strength. If the horses knew theirs, we should not ride any more.” by Chipit in history

[–]pcpmasterrace 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Traditionally they had a noblesse oblige, though today the ultra-rich are radical individualists and see no duty toward the greater society. They are just as rootless and cosmopolitan, and they are still half of the problem.

Mark Twain's 1898 Harper’s essay “Concerning the Jews.” He wrote about what might happen should “the cunningest brains in the world” find political cohesion: “It will not be well to let the race find out its strength. If the horses knew theirs, we should not ride any more.” by Chipit in history

[–]jet199 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

You're basically discribing every upper class around the world. The British aristocrat operates the same way. The upper end of the US political class operates the same way. Etc.

Mark Twain's 1898 Harper’s essay “Concerning the Jews.” He wrote about what might happen should “the cunningest brains in the world” find political cohesion: “It will not be well to let the race find out its strength. If the horses knew theirs, we should not ride any more.” by Chipit in history

[–]jet199 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

All people in power abuse it. Power itself corrupts. If you remove the pigs you just get another group on top which acts the same way.

Met the new boss same as the old boss.

Mark Twain's 1898 Harper’s essay “Concerning the Jews.” He wrote about what might happen should “the cunningest brains in the world” find political cohesion: “It will not be well to let the race find out its strength. If the horses knew theirs, we should not ride any more.” by Chipit in history

[–]Chipit[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

If they are a whole lot smarter than everyone else then why shouldn't they be in charge.

Because they abuse their position to benefit themselves at the expense of everyone else. It's like Animal Farm, the animals were better off without the pigs.

Mark Twain's 1898 Harper’s essay “Concerning the Jews.” He wrote about what might happen should “the cunningest brains in the world” find political cohesion: “It will not be well to let the race find out its strength. If the horses knew theirs, we should not ride any more.” by Chipit in history

[–]pcpmasterrace 6 insightful - 1 fun6 insightful - 0 fun7 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

It's not about intelligence, they have the same intellectual capacity as Europeans and East Asians. The difference is that they have no fondness for goyish morals. They are shameless and fiercely nepotistic. They have a racial supremacist religion which binds them together and justifies any actions done to outsiders for the benefit of their race. This allows them to gain power in an already prosperous society, for a while at least, but they can never let good enough alone, and their arrogance is their downfall.

Mark Twain's 1898 Harper’s essay “Concerning the Jews.” He wrote about what might happen should “the cunningest brains in the world” find political cohesion: “It will not be well to let the race find out its strength. If the horses knew theirs, we should not ride any more.” by Chipit in history

[–]jet199 3 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 0 fun4 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

This is the trouble with the master race theorists. For their big Jewish conspiracy to work then Jewish people need to be a whole lot smarter than everyone else. If they are a whole lot smarter than everyone else then why shouldn't they be in charge.

Leftist antisemites can get round this if they sign up to anti-intellectualism, the kind of leftists who kill doctors and scientists when they get power then wonder why millions of people die. If they can paint cleverness as evil and base ignorance as the greatest good then they can just about fudge it. But no one wants to be those guys.

Praetorian Guard: The Elite Military Unit of the Roman Empire who Protected the Emperor [4m28s] by magnora7 in history

[–][deleted] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I am putting this into a separate comment, because this is a bit of a tangent. The Germanic people in general seem to have a warrior-like tendency, with some of their military orders being among the oldest of the world. I am mentioning this here because I could not help but think of the Order of the Teutonic Knights, which are an active society to this day, stretching all the way back to 1192.

It is interesting because, justifiably, we focus on present political dynamics to judge the character, the influence, and the strength of a nation, but then we forget that many cultures stretch back many times further than the United States, for example, have even existed. We often have a tendency to pass on the crown of the world's most eminent empire to the United States, but then we should remind ourselves that it has only really held that title post WWII, for a few decades, and is already showing signs of decline, whereas some people can trace back their inception to the Roman Empire. What empires endure or fall, which powers rise, is often hard to say from view of a mere few decades. I have lived in buildings in Europe that were older than America has even existed as a country. We should have the humility to have that perspective.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teutonic_Order

Also of tangential relevance:

The Holy Roman Empire (Latin: Sacrum Imperium Romanum; German: Heiliges Römisches Reich), occasionally but unofficially referred to as the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation,[8] was a multi-ethnic complex of territories in Western and Central Europe that developed during the Early Middle Ages and continued until its dissolution in 1806 during the Napoleonic Wars.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Roman_Empire

For better or for worse, Germanic people seem to have some fiercely martial traits.

Praetorian Guard: The Elite Military Unit of the Roman Empire who Protected the Emperor [4m28s] by magnora7 in history

[–][deleted] 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Yes, those are interesting observations. But, I am not sure if the comparison necessarily do their ethical behaviors justice, in that time at least. They were fiercely loyal and much of what is now derided as a political takeover was, in their own words, done out of loyalty to the emperor at the time. If they were right to be this loyal to the point of supporting a corrupt emperor, I do not know. Maybe, if they had been loyal to a founding document, as opposed to the sort of personal loyalty that seemed more common then, they would have acted differently. I am not a history expert, though, just interested in the same.

Either way, if you agree with some of their actions or not, they often put their own principles above their own safety and gave their lives in the service of others. I haven't watched all of the video, yet, but judging by its length, it is probably very compressed. It takes a lot of context, I think, to put many of the political events at the time in context.

Some of the best historical accounts can probably still be found in the works of such celebrated scholars as Theodor Mommsen. It would be unfair of me to expect a five minute video on YouTube to do that era any justice.

Praetorian Guard: The Elite Military Unit of the Roman Empire who Protected the Emperor [4m28s] by magnora7 in history

[–][deleted] 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

The Imperial German Bodyguard, the Batavi, were one of the most elite military groups of that time. They also seemed to have had a strong moral code as they appear to have taken very firmly principled moral stands that sometimes put them in harsh opposition to the political dynamics that eventually fractured Rome and its empire. Loyalty, bravery, and strength. Those were some of the core features of the Batavi.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Numerus_Batavorum

The guard was disbanded briefly after the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest,[citation needed][18] and was finally dissolved by Galba in 68[3] because of its loyalty to Nero (ruled 54-68), whom he had overthrown. The decision caused deep offense to the Batavi, and contributed to the outbreak of the Revolt of the Batavi in the following year.[19] Their indirect successors were the Equites singulares Augusti which were, likewise, mainly recruited from the Germani. They were apparently so similar to the Julio-Claudians' earlier German Bodyguard that they were given the same nickname, the "Batavi".[20]

Tacitus (De origine et situ Germanorum XXIX) described the Batavi as the bravest of the tribes of the area, hardened in the Germanic wars, with cohorts under their own commanders transferred to Britannia. They retained the honour of the ancient association with the Romans, not required to pay tribute or taxes and used by the Romans only for war [...]

Tragically, many of them fell victim to political intrigue and other abuses, as is often the case in a world ruled by powerful political entities. The Batavi were also some of the few forces that have ever been able to achieve significant victories at that time against the Roman Empire, although not without employing some of the Romans' own military tactics against them. Whether that should diminish their victories or be a testament to their military strategy acumen, on top of mere strength and bravery, I am not sure.

Either way, despite only comprising a tiny portion of Rome's military forces, they seem to have been able to hit far above their weight, so to speak:

The Batavi auxilia amounted to about 5,000 men, implying that for the entire Julio-Claudian period, over 50% of all Batavi males reaching military age (16 years) may have enlisted in the auxilia. Thus the Batavi, although just about 0.05% of the total population of the empire in AD 23, supplied about 4% of the total auxilia i.e. 80 times their proportionate share.[citation needed] They were regarded by the Romans as the best and bravest (fortissimi, validissimi) of their auxiliary, and indeed of all their forces.[3] In Roman service, they had perfected a unique technique for swimming across rivers wearing full armour and weapons.[4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Revolt_of_the_Batavi

Praetorian Guard: The Elite Military Unit of the Roman Empire who Protected the Emperor [4m28s] by magnora7 in history

[–]magnora7[S] 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Wow this is pretty interesting, the Praetorian Guards eventually started running Rome and became more powerful than the Emperor. It got to where he needed their approval to do things, and the Praetorian Guards were killing off new Emperor candidates they didn't like.

Sounds a lot like today in the US in some ways. Just shows these cycles come and go throughout human history

Camp at Shoshone Falls, Idaho, 1868, photographed by Timothy O’Sullivan. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]SierraKiloBravo[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

It looks pretty awesome!

Camp at Shoshone Falls, Idaho, 1868, photographed by Timothy O’Sullivan. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]ElifromtheBook 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Idaho is soo fkn beautiful. If i liked US of A(sshat's administration), i'd lived in Idaho.

That's a given.

Disneyland opened 65 years ago today. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]_XEAL_ 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Fuck you, Disney Company

Disneyland opened 65 years ago today. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]Blended_Scotch 2 insightful - 2 fun2 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

Source?

Disneyland opened 65 years ago today. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]africant 2 insightful - 2 fun2 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

a whole theme park dedicated to a company that's powered by a culture of child rape. btw visiting disneyland with your children gets their faces entered into catalogues for wealthy child rapists so when you return home they can be abducted

Disneyland opened 65 years ago today. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]WMT 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I think disneyland would be a lot more popular if it wasn't in los angeles

The Farm is an intentional community based on principles of nonviolence and respect for the Earth. It was founded in 1971 by Stephen Gaskin, and 300 spiritual seekers from Haight-Ashbury and San Francisco. by [deleted] in history

[–]Chipit 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

This was 100% commie all the way. They didn't use money. They gave away food to the hungry. It failed because humans aren't like that and their open borders policy led to about 40 working men supporting a population of about 1000 useless eaters.

Here's what it was like, according to the people who were there. https://kk.org/mt-files/writings/why_we_left_the_farm.pdf

When asked about why she left, Leela Pratt said, “We were so poor we had nothing to eat at times but corn meal, buckwheat flour and black-eyed peas. I didn’t want to be dirt poor and living in Tennessee any longer,”

https://blog.richmond.edu/fysutopiasfall2015/2015/12/15/final-research-report-the-rise-and-fall-of-the-farm/

“I found a gum wrapper on the ground and I smelled it for a week until the smell went away…because that’s how wanting I was…of anything besides soybeans and tortillas”

The Farm is an intentional community based on principles of nonviolence and respect for the Earth. It was founded in 1971 by Stephen Gaskin, and 300 spiritual seekers from Haight-Ashbury and San Francisco. by [deleted] in history

[–][deleted] 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I think the term might come out of the commune type stuff (like this place) that was going on, that people were trying to figure out, etc.

That Time Charlie Chaplin Almost Got Assassinated In Japan by magnora7 in history

[–]SierraKiloBravo 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Wow I did not know this! Great post, TIL.

Dr. Frederick Banting and insulin by neovulcan in history

[–]ALesbian 4 insightful - 1 fun4 insightful - 0 fun5 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Banting sold the insulin patent for $1.00. Banting refused to add his name to the insulin patent because he found it unethical for a doctor to benefit from a discovery that saved lives. His colleagues, James Collip and Charles Best, eventually sold the insulin patent for a symbolic dollar to the University of Toronto.

Determined to prevent insulin from becoming a business racket, the Toronto team kept Eli Lilly at bay through months' worth of repeated attempts to collaborate. The university had been doing its best to manufacture insulin on its own, but struggled to meet the demands of even the small group of patients participating in early trials. What limited supply it did produce was subject to shortages and contamination, which Lilly reps were all too happy to emphasize in making their case that a professional, scaled-up manufacturing operation was in the best interests of diabetes patients.

Eventually, Banting and his team reluctantly agreed: Lilly was granted exclusive rights to manufacture and distribute insulin in the United States for one year, with European rights going to a Danish firm called Nordisk (later merged to become Novo Nordisk, as it is known today). Thereafter, both firms were entitled to patent any future innovations on their products, and competitors were hypothetically free to enter the market.

But the wholesale prices of the most common insulins tripled from 2007 to 2017. The three pharmaceutical companies that manufacture insulin—Lilly, Novo Nordisk, and Sanofi—rake in billions in profits annually from insulin sales alone, with the U.S. market accounting for 15 percent of global insulin users but almost 50 percent of its worldwide revenues.

Many patients in America ration it out because the co-pays are so high. A family member with what is considered good insurance has a $200 per month co-pay for her child with type 1 diabetes.

This article explains how it went from that $1.00 patent sale to big business today. I wonder what Banting would say if he only knew what has happened to the cost of insulin.

https://prospect.org/health/insulin-racket/

Bombshell quote missing from Emmett Till tape. So did Carolyn Bryant Donham really recant? by AllCongressIsZionist in history

[–]AllCongressIsZionist[S] 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Timothy B. Tyson claims Carolyn Bryant told him she lied about Emmett till, but her family denies it.

Tyson had a recorder when he was interviewing Carolyn Bryant, but admits he didn't actually record her saying she recanted.

The controversy rests on the entirely word of Tyson saying that she did. Tyson's story has since been used to fuel anti-white sentiment.

Ševčenko's law describing historians as dogs pissing at high frequency and accuracy on similar sets of trees despite the entire forest of general historical coverage available. by Ephemeral in history

[–]Ephemeral[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Einstein said: To repeat over and over the same mechanism, behaviors and/or procedures looking for a different result is the first sign of insanity.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/326255080_Reconsidering_%27The_Sane_Society%27

Lettuce discuss...

Exploring the Pacific - Magellan's Mistake - Extra History - #4 by [deleted] in history

[–]VantaFount 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

This is, by far, my favorite channel on Youtube. Between their usual Extra Credits episodes, Extra History, and Extra SciFi; I can always find something worth watching.

Orwell's Review of Hitler's "Mein Kampf": A Lesson for Today by sproketboy in history

[–]everythings 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I really need to look into this black cube. Do you think they have pamphlets like JW or missionaries like LDS?

Orwell's Review of Hitler's "Mein Kampf": A Lesson for Today by sproketboy in history

[–][deleted] 0 insightful - 2 fun0 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

Yeah, their lgbt rights group is also ran by black cube worshippers ironically

Orwell's Review of Hitler's "Mein Kampf": A Lesson for Today by sproketboy in history

[–]everythings 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Their mediation room worships the black cube last I checked.

Orwell's Review of Hitler's "Mein Kampf": A Lesson for Today by sproketboy in history

[–][deleted] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

The UN is infact very evil

Orwell's Review of Hitler's "Mein Kampf": A Lesson for Today by sproketboy in history

[–]ElifromtheBook 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

NICE. Thanks.

Orwell's Review of Hitler's "Mein Kampf": A Lesson for Today by sproketboy in history

[–]madcow-5 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

The keynote point he makes is Orwell said some positive things about Hitler's personality. It's not typically controversial that the guy was charismatic. He probably wouldn't have risen to power otherwise.

List Of Books About Genocides And Persecutions That Are Not Typically Discussed (gallery) by zyxzevn in history

[–]lmaonope333 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

and Romani (g*psy) people who were killed in the holocaust. they are often overlooked

10 July 1940, marks the beginning of the Battle of Britain. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]SierraKiloBravo[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

I really LOVE this movie. One of the key things that got me interested in history as a kid

List Of Books About Genocides And Persecutions That Are Not Typically Discussed (gallery) by zyxzevn in history

[–]TheKentuckyRifleman 1 insightful - 2 fun1 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

Outstanding

List Of Books About Genocides And Persecutions That Are Not Typically Discussed (gallery) by zyxzevn in history

[–]zyxzevn[S] 2 insightful - 2 fun2 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

Certainly..

List Of Books About Genocides And Persecutions That Are Not Typically Discussed (gallery) by zyxzevn in history

[–]TheKentuckyRifleman 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Can we include Armenia(Turkey), Holodmor (USSR) Colonia Dignidad (South American Nazi colony), the Caribbean (the Spanish)?

10 July 1940, marks the beginning of the Battle of Britain. by SierraKiloBravo in history

[–]Fruktig 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

The 1969 movie "Battle of Britain" is brilliant:

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0064072/

I've watched it twice.

List Of Books About Genocides And Persecutions That Are Not Typically Discussed (gallery) by zyxzevn in history

[–]zyxzevn[S] 3 insightful - 2 fun3 insightful - 1 fun4 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

What about: Yemen (Saudi Arabia), Vietnam (US), Iraq (US), Palestine (Israel), Kongo (Belgium) and Syria (Isis) ?

And much more.

Battle fatigue - did it affect soldiers in the ancient world? by AliceofX in history

[–]hennaojichan 1 insightful - 2 fun1 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 2 fun -  (0 children)

doolally: Uncle Eddie's gone doolally again. From the Indian town of Deolali where British soldiers were sent to wait for the next ship home and also had a sanitorium for those who had suffered battle fatique or other illnesses. Because there might be months delay between ships back to England, many of the soldiers went doolally while waiting. I think he did a good job of explaining the condition.

Maybe but not sure that the first frame comes from the movie All Quiet on the Western Front or maybe Kubrick's Paths of Glory.

Forests in the olden days by AliceofX in history

[–]aThievingStableboy 3 insightful - 1 fun3 insightful - 0 fun4 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

asetaset

Sack of Rome (410) - Wikipedia (Look familiar???) by cons_nc in history

[–]Scot 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Did the participants of the revolution in the US not pull down a king charles statue to melt it for musket balls and other things for the battle? Don't ask me where I read that, might even have been here I can't remember. I do envy the fact you won against the english back then, the english/european elite are far worse than any other, marquees de sade fantasist psychopaths.

Sack of Rome (410) - Wikipedia (Look familiar???) by cons_nc in history

[–]Newmug 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Whatever you pedo sympathizer. Jog on