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[–]samwhiskeyMethod of Destruction 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (9 children)

Yeah, one for one. The thing about butter is that it has water in it as well as a lower scorch temp. Plus unrefined coconut oil tastes fucking great by itself.

One thing I wanted to do but haven't yet is to use the coconut oil to make candies. A little flavor and a candy mold would have some nice poppable little buzz units. Although it has a low melting point so you'd have to keep them refrigerated.

You could also make some rick simpson oil and put it in gel caps. Haven't tried that myself but looks doable.

BTW that chili recipe looked bomb as hell. I have a grill that has a place for a side smoker attachment. Do you think if I got one of those it would work for a brisket? No real way to monitor temp though I guess.

[–]DrHorribleMaster of Delusion[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (8 children)

If you have enough space on the grill look at ways to do indirect heat for your model. Basically all the heat to one side, and empty on the other. you can get wood chips in the grocery store and add them, hourly. After 5-6 hours it is pointless to have smoke, and you can actually transfer to an oven at the same temp (or higher to speed things up) for the rest of the cook. Get cheap meat probes and check the meat after 2 hours. You can also get cheap oven thermometers to monitor the temp at the grate. If the lid is open you aint cooking, but a more consistent temp is better, so check at least hourly and rotate meat to even the cooking. Big chunks (brisket and pork shoulder) can stall around 155-165 and stay at that temp for hours. Do not freak. Either let it just cook, of wrap it very tight in foil or peach butchers paper. In foil add a little liquid (beer, beef broth, or water) and wrap tightly. Texas crutch. It will steam and get past the stall and cook quicker. You will moisten the bark though. No biggie for chili. Brisket is cooked to 203 or like a cake where is a smooth poke with no resistance. Usually around 195 or higher. Depends one the quality of meat.

I got brisket flats from Bj's for the recipe. They are smallish. 5-8lbs. Cook temp on smoke is around 250. 250 for 3ish hours then wraped and temp bumped up to 300, it was about a 5-6 hour cook.
No foil will take longer. cook to temp not time.

[–]samwhiskeyMethod of Destruction 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (7 children)

Ok, that makes sense. Now if I want a really good crisp char what is the best way? I like my crispy knibbles.

[–]DrHorribleMaster of Delusion[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (4 children)

No wrap for a good crust. But it will be a longer cook. It can be done on a gas grill. Foil pack for the wood chips. Just make sure the meat is not over the heat. It needs to be indirect and rotated to even the meat temp.
I am at the point of using pellet grills these days for the convenience. Plus my temp monitoring stuff is tied into my home automation so i get many alerts set on my temperature ranges.
Brisket flats can be thin. and uneven side to side. So monitoring after a couple of hours and rotating is crucial.

[–]samwhiskeyMethod of Destruction 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (3 children)

I only have charcoal but I'm familiar with indirect heat as we've grilled several turkeys over the years. So rotating and cooking to temp is the trick, don't worry about time so much. I may just give it a go soon to experiment.

There is a meat market locally but walmart had some brisket the other day, so is it necessary to avoid chains like walmart or is their brisket gonna be on par with a meat market. I don't really live in cow country any more but I'm not in a metro big city so not really sure what I need. Also, what to look for in a slab?

[–]DrHorribleMaster of Delusion[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (1 child)

Walmart brisket is not bad. I have bought sams club stuff and it is pretty decent. If the package has a kill date (may need to get it off the box form the back) you can wet age it. I would have to look into the wet age. My specialty is actually pork. I can prep and cook pork ribs with about 20% vision and be 1/8th awake. Pork butt is pretty easy also.
A good way to know a decent brisket is by picking it up in the middle and the more it folds in half the more tender it will be. And ready to cook. Also, the difference in brisket. There is a packer. It is heavy as it is the flat, bottom, lean part. And also the point, top fatty part that is used for burnt ends. Packers are usually 12lbs and more, give or take a couple of pounds. I used flat for the chili. Usually easier to get and it is usually trimmed half way decent.

[–]DrHorribleMaster of Delusion[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Next class can be reverse seer tri-tip. It will change your world.

[–]DrHorribleMaster of Delusion[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

Last post for the night. If you have a restaurant Depot in your area (Google them) easiest way to get to use them without the required business license is join the KCBS. You get one day passes as a perk.

[–]DrHorribleMaster of Delusion[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (1 child)

howtobbqright (malcom reed) has many recipes on various types of grills. I cannot recommend him enough. He is a good starting point for the beginner and the expert in all of us.

[–]samwhiskeyMethod of Destruction 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

howtobbqright

checking it out now